Mathematics / physics

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Little Scrapper, Jun 17, 2019.

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  1. Jun 17, 2019 #1

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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  2. Jun 17, 2019 #2

    narfi

    narfi

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    Irrelevant!! Jetpacks are awsome.

    (Sorry...... a coworker has been quoting that at the hanger maybe a bit too much, but it fits so well into any topic. I'll try to read your link when I have time)
     
  3. Jun 17, 2019 #3

    fly2kads

    fly2kads

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    Good reading, thanks!
     
  4. Jun 17, 2019 #4

    TFF

    TFF

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    It’s the actual hell a parent may go through. There are smart kids, smarter than average kids, average kids, lesser than average kids. Which one is yours and did you do the right thing to help them along?(not pointing anyone specifically) Lots of very smart kids don’t fit in the regular system just as the ones that have learning problems. System is made for regular kids, hopefully the parents pick up the differences and understand. I have a hard time learning if I don’t care. I know plenty who can learn whatever because they were told they had too. I know genius that learned high school by 7th grade, maybe before, but parents made him go all the way. He tested out of first and second year college. He probably could have the rest but they were not going to give him a free degree. Cant be bad if you are famously right like Einstein.
     
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  5. Jun 17, 2019 #5

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    I think airplanes are a great tool to make math and physics relevant.

    My Dad was a math major, absolutely brilliant man. I struggled through math and my dad really helped me understand it by using my passion (mechanical things) as something to help explain it. Learning my memorization was just tough for me. Higher levels of math were like a form of punishment. My senior year I wanted to just snap. I'm a very visual type of learner which isn't ideal for most schools. I got through it though. It all worked out I guess.

    I made this post because I thought it was kinda relevant here. Lots of people talking about design here and really that's probably a good way to learn by involving actual airplanes.
     
  6. Jun 17, 2019 #6

    Pops

    Pops

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    You must be talking about my youngest son. Was past 12th grade high school in the 7th grade. Teachers hated him, he loved to correct the teachers and tell them what page and chapter to check in the books and then he would quote from memory, he was a night mare for all of the HS teachers except of one. Finished an engineering degree up in 3 years while working full time. Got interested in the stock market at about 12 years old and got out of that at about 35 years old. Besides public school, he was home schooled in the evening until he passed me at about 13 years old. Loved, loved any type of math, latter he would lecture me for an hour in math and I wouldn't understand anything that he was talking about . Now 54 years old. His oldest son has been in a school for gifted students since 8 years old and now at 23 years old, engineer with his first patent under his belt.
    Yes, the system is for regular kids, and its hard on the gifted child and also hard on the parents.
    My father was gifted in math and he used his in a different way. He was one of the people that is not allowed in Vegas casinos. Very wealthy for a long time until the IRS and I remember all of that. The reason I went to live with my grandfather. Long family story.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2019
  7. Jun 18, 2019 #7

    Jay Kempf

    Jay Kempf

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    I so struggled in school. Mainly because there was no relevance. Now I devour everything, math, physics, management, material science, psychology... whatever rabbit hole presents itself. Some things are meaningless fantasies of just understanding, others are immediate needs. I have always learned by descending to the end of a real world problem to the bottom of all the plot threads that create the top level understanding. Breaking things apart and really understanding all the parameters that make up a very complicated looking real world solution is the only way to not be overwhelmed. No one taught me that in school.

    Calculus was fascinating but not applied in undergrad. Physics was applied but in sort of boring and simplistic. Combine the two on a real applied problem and then you have some deep understanding of how to build and test anything. But at least in undergrad it doesn't get there because there is just too much material to breeze through.

    Not sure if schools are better now, but I think not. All of my female relatives married into the family or blood lines are teachers from elementary to special ed up to high school physics and chemistry. We debate all the time how to not have problem students fall through the cracks. They still do. Einstein did. He is and always has been an inspiration to those kids that don't follow the main group and struggled to be part of the masses.

    I remain the non-degreed anomaly that my teacher relatives use as a counter argument for doing it the right way. I always wished I could have done it the right way. Would have been a lot easier. But then I wouldn't be me so who cares. People who choose to live in deep rabbit holes are useful but they are a problem because they are all non-conformists. Companies have love/hate relationships with really smart independent people especially in the technical sphere. Very hard to manage. Very hard for MBA's to quantify quants.

    I so agree with Scrapper that airplanes are the best way to absorb yourself in every technical discipline and to bring yourself to relevance.

    Soapbox mode <off>
     
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  8. Jun 18, 2019 #8

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Strictly my opinion but I think I know the direction I'd take education if I were king.

    Well, clearly it's a difficult challenge because we need a deep shift in mentality in how we view education and that includes parents as well. Incredibly difficult to even have this conversation but here goes.

    I think I'd look at decades of research done by clinical psychologists, the psychoanalysists, etc. The facts about human beings are well documented, it's not a secret. We are unique and we all have personalities that are different. Some are high in extroversion, some are creative, some are neurotic, open, closed, analytical, artistic the list goes on. The current education model is completely outdated and doesn't take that in to consideration and that is just wrong.

    I believe we should have a goal to recognize these gifts early in children and expand it.

    I'll be going to my 30 year reunion soon. I know all the straight A genius kids in my class, I'd say 70% of them have had complete and total failure at life. Bad, real bad. Many of the athletic jocks? Alcoholics.

    Personality and a growth mindset is what impresses me, I literally could care less about anything else. I've learned in life that type of person makes the best friends, the best leaders and the highest of character almost always rests with those individuals. They handle emotion well, the don't run from anxiety they embrace it and use it as a challenge to solve the problem anxiety is telling you to solve.

    The person with a great personality and a growth mindset are the ones who hire the smart people, they tend to be creative but tempered. They manage emotions well and know how to focus. People who focus and manage emotions are almost always very successful on multiple levels including relationships with a spouse and children.

    So, it's a real problem. Parents and schools preach to kids and yell at them to focus yet how many are taught to focus? Focus is a learned behavior, it's something that can be taught. Mindfulness too. Buddhist monks have known for centuries how to harness focus and control emotion, we should be teaching kids these things long before school starts. We should be focused on relationships, on people, on art, on discovering passion, working together on these goals knowing this is where true success is later in life where it matters most.

    Again, this is extremely complex. The person who gets straight A's? Sorry, that's no longer the ideal model, I can get answers to anything in 4-5 clicks. My kids are high honor roll students, it's completely irrelevant, 78% of my daughters graduating class were honor roll students. It's pathetic. Focus on showing kids things that really matter and grades will be automatically handled.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2019
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