California Company Reinvents the Rotary Engine

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davehill

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Jun 26, 2014
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I was one of the few thousand folks who was duped into the Mazda RX3 rotary engine car. What a freaking nightmare!!!! Got 6 mpg! Had to have it inspected every 100 miles to maintain warranty. I have hated Mazada ever since. Can't say enough bad things about it and stay within the rules of this forum.
 

Billrsv4

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Sep 29, 2016
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With the entire engine weight spinning. It must not have any torsional vibration at all.:)
168, Torsional problem, no. Torque problem YES! Not to mention there was no throttle control! The brrap-brrap-brrap you hear when one of those engines is running is the pilot or operator controlling RPM with an ignition kill switch!
Bill
 

Swampyankee

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To quote a [minor] character in Hitchhikers' Guide to the Galaxy, "not again."

All of reason for the consistent failure of rotaries may be the existence of quite successful piston engines, but do remember that a more radical technology -- Brayton cycle gas turbines -- did succeed, and that rotaries are consistently failing because, even were they to be marginally "better," something no rotary has demonstrated in any significant manner, they would have to be much better to displace a very successful technology.

It's not some evil cabal of manufacturers keeping rotaries down. It's that rotaries just aren't good enough.
 

cheapracer

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they would have to be much better to displace a very successful technology.
That's the one.

Engines are a trillion dollar a year industry, anyone who thinks all those people are just merely going to walk away from their billions of dollars investments for a lets say 10% improvement that would take their lifetime to get a real market hold, and Mazda are testament to that, are deluded.

No Industrialist wants to re-invent the wheel.
 

blane.c

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It is not just about hp to weight, it is also about specific fuel consumption and all of the rotary designs I have seen have a high sfc compared to piston.
 

Swampyankee

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Mazda, with the RX-7 and RX-8, found the one market niche were the Wankel could compete in: limited use vehicles where fuel economy and lifetime were not important.
 

Vigilant1

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It is not just about hp to weight, it is also about specific fuel consumption and all of the rotary designs I have seen have a high sfc compared to piston.
I'd agree that a modern liquid-cooled piston engine has better SFC than a liquid-cooled Wankel. But a Wankel engine with PSRU installed in an airplane has approximately the same SFC as an air-cooled piston engine that would otherwise be there. So, it depends which piston engine we are comparing the Wankel to. The large tolerances required in an air-cooled piston engine and the 1930s technology that much of the GA fleet engine fleet still employs do take a toll on fuel burn. If running at about 75% of rated power, a BSFC of about .47 to .49 is what we can expect from either an air-cooled piston with magneto and carb or a Wankel.
 
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