Adjustable feet for workbench

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by skeeter_ca, Aug 13, 2008.

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  1. Aug 13, 2008 #1

    skeeter_ca

    skeeter_ca

    skeeter_ca

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    I'm building my workbench and am wondering how do you make adjustable feet that are strong and cheap. I like the idea of using bolts into the bottom of the legs but how do you screw them in? How would you mount a nut in the leg to screw them into. It is a 4' x 8' bench and will be quite heavy.

    skeeter
     
  2. Aug 14, 2008 #2

    Norman

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    Drill a hole and epoxy a nut in it. I score the outside of the nut with a dremal tool so the epoxy has more area to bond to. If you're concerned that a regular nut may tip from heavy workloads use a long coupler nut. With the table upside down pour some epoxy in the hole and coat your nut to make sure the outside grooves are filled. Put a Vaseline coated bolt in the nut to prevent epoxy from getting into the threads. Then drop it in the hole. You can use a drilled block and a washer to hold the bolt vertical while the epoxy sets
     
  3. Aug 14, 2008 #3

    Big Steve

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    My work bench has adjustable legs. Basically it is a pipe inside of another pipe. I welded a nut to the end of the inner pipe and a screw threads into it. The pipes have holes in the side so you can lift them up and change the position of the bolt. Very simple but you do need a welder. STeve
     
  4. Aug 14, 2008 #4

    etterre

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    How about using a blind nut "backwards"? I've seen some fairly large sizes at Home Depot/Lowe's. Drill a hole in the leg of the bench then insert the blind nut with the flat face out. You might want to put a small square of steel on the floor to spread the weight from the bolt head..
     

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  5. Aug 14, 2008 #5

    Craig

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    Appliance repair stores usually have the type of adjustable feet that can be screwed in, complete with nylon outer surface. Just need to epoxy the nut in as Norm outlines above. Or you can raid an abandoned fridge or range or washer.
     
  6. Aug 14, 2008 #6

    Norman

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    Appliance legs seem a bit scrawny to me but washers vibrate a lot so if you go that way they're probably a safe bet. I'd get the biggest bolts that I felt comfortable drilling a hole for. At least 1/2” bolts. I assume we're talking about a wooden table with square legs. In that case I wouldn't want to make a hole in the end grain much more than 1/3 of the width of the peice. Say you're using doug fur 4x4 for legs. That can take a 1.25” hole so find a nut that's 1.25” corner to corner for your leg socket. A blind nut also sounds like a fine idea.
     
  7. Aug 15, 2008 #7

    WileEZ

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    A note from personal experience, if you ask for a "blind nut" and get a blank stare in return, ask for a "t-nut". It's the same thing, but apparently different terminology in different parts of the country.
     
  8. Aug 15, 2008 #8

    Dana

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    Go to McMaster-Carr and search for "swivel leveling pads".

    They have tee nuts also.

    -Dana

    Growing old is inevitable, but we can stay immature indefinitely.
     
  9. Aug 15, 2008 #9

    skeeter_ca

    skeeter_ca

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    I think just using a bolt as the adjustable leg would work great. It's on a concrete floor so a don't have to worry about scratching it. I really like the tee-nut idea. I will look at my local hardward (ace or true value) to see if they have the 1/2-13 tee-nuts and use a 1/2 bolt as the adjusting leg. I think that should be a good size for a heavy table like this. And cheap too!

    skeeter
     
  10. Aug 18, 2008 #10

    skeeter_ca

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    Ok, no tee-nuts found available in 1/2" size. I built the table this weekend and it has turned out pretty good. For the adjustable feet i used the nut and bolt combo. The feet consist of two 2x4's screwed and glued together. Then i drilled a 3/4" hole in the center of the 2x4's about a 1/2" deep and a 1/2" hole in the center of that about 2" deeper. I then hammered the nut into the leg till it seated at the bottom of the 3/4" hole. It is very tight in the wood so i did not use any epoxy. I will be turning the table over today and leveling it. Hope it turns out nice and flat. i was thinking of doing a thread on building it if anyone is interested. I have lots of pics.

    skeeter
     
  11. Aug 19, 2008 #11

    Mike Armstrong

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    I'd be interested Skeeter, thanks.


    Mike
     
  12. Aug 30, 2008 #12

    Allan

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    I plan to use 4x4 legs with husky lag bolts (lag screws) for height adjustment. Cheap and easy, plenty strong enough, no wobble, and no lock nut required. I think 1/2" x 4" will be OK with about 1/2" left "unscrewed" for adjustment.
     
  13. Sep 7, 2008 #13

    base363

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  14. Sep 10, 2008 #14

    Jman

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    I ended up using Carriage Bolts like the one pictured below. Because my garage floor had a very rough surface I also cut 2"x2"x1/2" squares of plywood for the head of the carriage bolt to rest on. I used a large drill bit to drill a small depression in the plywood to prevent the domed head from slipping around on the hard surface. One advantage is that I can adjust the legs with any amount of weight on the table because the bolts just twist inside the depression in the plywood as I turn the bolt with a wrench.

    As for screwing in the bolt, I drilled a long hole just larger than the diameter of the carriage bolt and then drilled a larger hole over it just deep enough to recess a Nut. I used epoxy to glue the nut in place with the bolt screwed most of the way in as an alignment guide making sure not to get any glue in the threads. Works great.
     

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