3D Printer build

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by FritzW, Dec 18, 2016.

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  1. Dec 18, 2016 #1

    FritzW

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    Santa got me a 3D printer for Christmas but since it's a kit she wants me to have it built in time to surprise me with it on Christmas morning :gig:

    printer2.jpg Here it is after 2 or 3 hours of assembling. It's a Chinese knockoff of an open source Prusa I3 (1/3 the price). So far I'm pretty impressed with the quality of the kit. The plans are in a dialect of Chinglish that I'm familiar with so it's going together pretty fast.

    715V5mSjUsL._SL1000_.jpg Here's what it should look like in a day or two. When I get it dialed in on ABS and PLA I'm going to see if I can make some real parts with NylonX.
     
  2. Dec 18, 2016 #2

    choppergirl

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    I wonder if the resolution on it is good enough to print embossed aircraft + manufacturer logo data plates. A good first experiment for you. If so, I gots requests... ;-) Everybody else, form a line behind me...

    Soon you'll be mass producing non-critical unregistered gun parts in no time... :p
     
  3. Dec 18, 2016 #3

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    Bootleg data plates are typically silk screened and I have a nice little metal shop setup for making and/or "fine tuning" gun parts.

    This thing is for making airplane parts. ...I hope. Maybe I can use it to make a robot T-88 mixer/squirter ;)
     
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  4. Dec 18, 2016 #4
    Very nice. I've been looking into the possibility of making one using parts from scrapped printers & photocopiers.
    It is possible - if you have a rather older system than mine, you can even get software to generate 3D models for all the fittings (Retr3d).
    Unfortunately, it needs considerable hacking to get it to work with the latest libraries - just not enough time.
     
  5. Dec 18, 2016 #5

    choppergirl

    choppergirl

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    How strong is that NylonX compared to Spruce, or Aluminum? (thinking... bigger bed carriage... ultralight wing ribs... probably better to just cut them out of a sheet of carbon fiber though)

    Not sure what other components you might make, except maybe custom mounting hardware or other stuff for inside the cockpit. Seems like metal or wood would be the go to raw material for just about everything else structurally airplane related, if you have a shop.

    Post some pictures of the first attempts at making something with it, even if they come out aborted.

    Ben Heck uses his 3D printer a lot to make custom project boxes and parts for his funky circuit board builds....
     
  6. Dec 18, 2016 #6

    N8053H

    N8053H

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    After you get this up and running, you should start making video's showing how to use on of these. Something for the layman like myself who has never used something like this but would like to. Kinda a how to for dummies....Wait did I just call myself a dummy... You could even do a video on how to build this from the kit as you did. Building this, some as myself could do. Operating it or making parts, I kinda doubt with my knowledge I could do that, not without some schoolin...lol

    Tony
     
  7. Dec 18, 2016 #7

    cheapracer

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    Isn't that an oxymoron?



    Build you good friend. Best we make!

    If you need any translation just PM me.
     
  8. Dec 18, 2016 #8

    ScaleBirdsScott

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    There's thousands of hours of how to 3d print videos already out there anyone with any inkling of wanting to make one has plenty of resources available to do the task.

    These kits are cool. If you really want to get into nice materials I suggest against using whatever extruder came with the printer (unless it's a high end unit and even then...) and using a high end eftermarket extruder setup. I've got years of use on a makerbot and almost all major issues with printing come down to a good extruder setup. The motion and control is cheap and easy. Getting the plastic to flow reliably is the hard part.
     
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  9. Dec 18, 2016 #9

    Pops

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    I'm with Tony, only worse. Wish I knew more, no, more like anything.
     
  10. Dec 18, 2016 #10

    mcrae0104

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  11. Dec 18, 2016 #11

    radfordc

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    I bought basically the same printer last month when it was on sale for $166. https://hobbyking.com/en_us/maylan-m150-i3-us-plug.html Mine came pre-assembled...I only needed to install four screws and connect a couple of plugs. The learning curve is not all that steep if you do a little googling and reading.

    I've been able to create some parts in Sketchup and print them out. Here is a servo mount for an RC servo.
     

    Attached Files:

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  12. Dec 18, 2016 #12

    radfordc

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    Google "how to use a 3d printer". That should keep you busy "learnin" for a while.
     
  13. Dec 19, 2016 #13

    FritzW

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    She's finished!

    Total build time was 5 or 6 hours (an hour of that was wrapping that silly spiral cable management stuff around the wiring). The only complaints with the kit were a few holes that weren't tapped deep enough (easy fix) and a few "C" clips on the bearings had to be massaged (tedious fix). Otherwise it went together like an Erector set. And lit off on the first try.

    printer3.jpg Lots of wiring but it was all pre-made and well marked (in 17 languages).

    printer4.jpg She fired right up and worked as advertised. I started tuning it up but figured I'd better wait until I get a piece of glass for the hot bed (99 cents at Hobby Lobby).

    The first things I need to do are:

    1) Add an on/off switch (now it turns on when you plug it in)
    2) Add proper belt tensioners (now they're "pull tight and tighten a screw")

    The second things I need to do are:

    3) Replace the hot end (part that melts the filament) with a higher temp hot end so I can use more exotic materials.

    3a) Replace the brass nozzle with a stainless one for the same reason as #3

    4) Replace the silly spiral cable management stuff with a proper 43-13, rib lacing cord wrap. ...or maybe print some nice cable trac.

    The goal of all of this is to add a nice dual head extruder to my 4x8 CNC machine (with 6 or 8 300x300 hot beds)) and print a snap together airplane ...someday:gig:
     
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  14. Dec 19, 2016 #14

    ScaleBirdsScott

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    I suggest going with E3D extruders/hotends if they are compatible with the unit, but you'll spend almost as much as the printer itself on them.
     
  15. Dec 19, 2016 #15

    Tiger Tim

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  16. Dec 19, 2016 #16

    Aviator168

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    FritzW, how much did you pay for it and what is website. I might want to get one myself if it is cheap enough. Print quality is not important as I am just using it for visual prototyping.
     
  17. Dec 19, 2016 #17

    N8053H

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    I agree info and more info please...

    While one could as was pointed out, search the web and make some little boat or something. Why not have a member of a group like this start a thread to teach the members how to use one of these. Instead of making a little boat start out making a small control cable fairing or whatever they are called. That is something that could be used if not on ones airplane maybe on ones RC airplane.

    I have done quite a lot of research on these. Heated tables seem to be the big issue as does multi heads if I remember correctly. I did this research about a year ago maybe a little longer. What I found was, purchasing the printer was the easy part. Operating it not so much. I elected to drop the idea of owning one and making parts, not without first taking a class on how to program the darn thing.
     
  18. Dec 19, 2016 #18

    Aviator168

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    Using the software to draw the exact thing you want is much more difficult. 3D printer makers failed to see this. There are not that many people know how to make CAD drawings.
     
  19. Dec 19, 2016 #19

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    The experienced 3D printer guys might have better suggestions but this is what I did:

    I bought this one. It was $259 when I ordered it, now they're $280. I guess the closer to Christmas we get the higher the price goes. ...starting December 26th I bet the prices start falling

    Here's a good youtube review of the ANET A8 printer

    There might be better choices out there but I got tired of looking, at some point you have to pull the trigger or you'll never get started (there are hundreds of choices in the <$300 range). The criteria I used were:

    1) Open source. From reading the 3D printer forums this is almost mandatory.
    2a) It was based on the Prusa I3, very propular, lots of options and almost generic compatibility.
    3) RepRap (able to make it's own parts) this one only has two parts that are 3D printed but has lots of printable upgrades.
    4) Shipped from North America from a company that would replace broken/missing parts.
    5) I watched the assembly videos and decided they were good enough to let me get it built.
    (ANET A8 assembly videos on this channel)
    6) Able to handle lots of different materials
    7) <$300

    I wasn't looking for a dual extruder because they add $200/$300 to the cost of the kit but only cost ~$100 to do yourself. They add lots of complication if your just starting out (like me). You can do a lot with "break away" supports so I don't need a second extruder ...yet

    I'll post any "new guy lessons learned" as I go along.
     
  20. Dec 19, 2016 #20

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    I'll post something on using the EAA version of Solidworks to make a part for printing. Maybe the Sketchup could also. It's not as hard as it looks. It's just the first few steps of the learning curve that are tough, after that the curve flattens out.
     

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