Using solidworks to verify wing egress from basement

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wmax351

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Oct 10, 2018
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Ann Arbor, MI
[h=2]I've got a basement i'm planning to turn into a workshop for a fly baby. I do want to confirm that I will be able to remove the plane without needing to build egress windows through the foundation.[/h]

The basement has a staircase in the middle, dividing between a finished and unfinished half. I'd rather not bother adding egress windows or similar digging in the foundation.

There are non-bearing walls on the side of the staircase, which I plan to knock down one or both as needed when the wings are complete. If needed, I can remove the stairs as well.

I'd build a mockup, but then I'd need to knock down the walls, and put them back up, to knock them down again.

So I build a mock up in solidworks. https://1drv.ms/u/s!An4agHH7T0TFiPIn4MIuLGiXCG9kRQ

The model has a rough version of the wing, and the basement set up with the walls removed. Once its through the stairs, it's a straight shot.

Anyone want to give it a go? I never got good at the motion control features. Any thoughts on other ways to figure out if it will fit short of cutting the walls down and making a cardboard/scrap wood model?​



 

Hot Wings

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[h=2]I've got a basement i'm planning to turn into a workshop for a fly baby. I do want to confirm that I will be able to remove the plane without needing to build egress windows through the foundation.
A guy here 40ish years ago dug up his front yard and broke a big hole in his foundation to get his Starduster out. Made the front page of the local news paper. The egress window might actually add value to the house?

Just drag the wing up the stairs manually in small increments and use the 'Interference Detection' under tools?
 

addicted2climbing

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I've got a basement i'm planning to turn into a workshop for a fly baby. I do want to confirm that I will be able to remove the plane without needing to build egress windows through the foundation.


The basement has a staircase in the middle, dividing between a finished and unfinished half. I'd rather not bother adding egress windows or similar digging in the foundation.

There are non-bearing walls on the side of the staircase, which I plan to knock down one or both as needed when the wings are complete. If needed, I can remove the stairs as well.

I'd build a mockup, but then I'd need to knock down the walls, and put them back up, to knock them down again.

So I build a mock up in solidworks. https://1drv.ms/u/s!An4agHH7T0TFiPIn4MIuLGiXCG9kRQ

The model has a rough version of the wing, and the basement set up with the walls removed. Once its through the stairs, it's a straight shot.

Anyone want to give it a go? I never got good at the motion control features. Any thoughts on other ways to figure out if it will fit short of cutting the walls down and making a cardboard/scrap wood model?​



Best way to do this is to not use your model of the wing with individual ribs but instead draw it as a solid wing as it would be with covering. Also add an extra inch all around for wiggle room, ie fingers and just to fully make sure something slightly larger can get out. Now make an assy and insert the wing into the room. You will need to use collision detection to find out if the wing hits between the room component and the wing model. I have a cut and paste on that below.

In the assembly you can make a new sketch with a path with construction lines that go up the stairs. Make 2 paths. In the wing model add 2 points (its in sketch) that can be constrained to the path. For now just experiment where these points are as well as the paths. Now mate the points to the path and move the wing... when it hits a wall it will stop and highlite the collision. Now the fun part begins... Fiddle with the path shape and the points on the wing to get the wing to follow a path that emulates you and another carrying it out. As the wing follows the path maybe it pivots around the corner and rotates at the same time... It all can be done with simple mates and collision detection. Also look up collision detection on youtube as there are sure to be videos that will help...

If in the end you find its gonna be tight, look for another place to build it.. :) Maybe it will work well in the bedroom and you can move the wife to the basement... Yah Right... :)

Collision detection.jpg
 

wmax351

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Oct 10, 2018
Messages
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Location
Ann Arbor, MI
Thanks, I'll give that a try.

If it looks real tight, I'll probably knock out the wall before I build up the wing, and then reinstall the wall in a way that makes it easier to do next time.

I measured the spare bedroom when I was first thinking about the project. If I used the closet, I can get the 14 feet I need for the fuselage, with a few inches to wiggle by at the end, or just crawl under the table. So that's physically an option. But maritially, it might not be. :p

My plan B is to fix up the garage. Would need some work to get it insulated enough to have even t88 cure in the winter, and to keep it from being too damp in the spring/summer. Probably less work than digging into the basement though.
 

lr27

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Nov 3, 2007
Messages
3,730
If it's too much trouble with the computer, break down and make scale models with foam core board. I think you can get cheesy foam core sheets at the eponymous price at a Dollar Store.
 

addicted2climbing

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Jan 27, 2012
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Glendale, CA
Thanks, I'll give that a try.

If it looks real tight, I'll probably knock out the wall before I build up the wing, and then reinstall the wall in a way that makes it easier to do next time.

I measured the spare bedroom when I was first thinking about the project. If I used the closet, I can get the 14 feet I need for the fuselage, with a few inches to wiggle by at the end, or just crawl under the table. So that's physically an option. But maritially, it might not be. :p

My plan B is to fix up the garage. Would need some work to get it insulated enough to have even t88 cure in the winter, and to keep it from being too damp in the spring/summer. Probably less work than digging into the basement though.
I live in an apartment so have no build space available. I joined my local EAA chapter and rent out a space in the hangar as my build space. Unsure if this would work for you, but I have a link below where you can find all the EAA chapters in MI. Maybe you have one close that has some build space for rent. While it is a little less convenient that I need to go there to build, I do like that its my space and if I were working in the garage would probably be interrupted more with Honeydew items... Also our Chapter hangar has some tools available to me that I did not have to buy like sheet metal brakes and a lathe.

https://www.eaa.org/en/eaa/eaa-chapters/find-an-eaa-chapter

Marc
 

Hot Wings

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My plan B is to fix up the garage. Would need some work to get it insulated enough to have even t88 cure in the winter, and to keep it from being too damp in the spring/summer. Probably less work than digging into the basement though.
Go with plan B!

An insulated garage is always usable even after/before the plane is finished. Foam board is quick. easy and relatively cheap. Some cheap* drywall, even if not finished looks better than bare studs. Adds value to the house and cuts down on heating bills when the garage isn't being heated. Add 220V if the garage doesn't already have it and use a window type reversible heat pump.

This also isolates the noise, fumes and dust from the main house much better than a basement workshop.

*Expect the price to rise once the hurricane rebuild gets into full swing.
 
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