Twin Blade Gyroplane

Discussion in 'Aircraft Design / Aerodynamics / New Technology' started by rotax618, Mar 1, 2019.

  1. Mar 1, 2019 #1

    rotax618

    rotax618

    rotax618

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    How would a full sized aircraft, based on the model in this youtube clip, fly?
    If it were to have a high low aspect short strut braced wing, multi blade rotors with pre-rotation, non tilt or limited tilt rotorheads, conventional ailerons, elevators and rudder for control.
    worth a thought:
    https://youtu.be/gFPOFlHXDGY
     
  2. Mar 2, 2019 #2

    D Hillberg

    D Hillberg

    D Hillberg

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    death trap?. It will need a full cyclic & collective system to trim for normal flight in calm air alone. what you see in the model is a fixed wing doing most the work.... Just the yaw forces alone would be a hand (foot) full.
     
  3. Mar 2, 2019 #3

    rotax618

    rotax618

    rotax618

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    Autorotating systems are self stabilizing I can’t see why you would need any collective control, if there was a small ajustment the the for/aft tilt of the blades for trim the lift on each side would stabilise, early autogyros used a similar system with pitch yaw and roll controls independent of the rotor.
     
  4. Mar 2, 2019 #4

    D Hillberg

    D Hillberg

    D Hillberg

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    no gyros with side by side fixed pitch rotors will stabilize after an up set (loss of control)- Look at early side by side helicopters or early Piasecki helicopters before cross shafting.......
    models don't scale up too well
     
  5. Mar 2, 2019 #5

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

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    [video]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7KvkYyCg2N0[/video]

    The problem with the early style limited rotor control gyros with elevators & ailerons is basically they run out of control power at the low speeds you want to land at.

    And if you've got two rotors, you might as well spend a metric ton more cash to make a real helicopter.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focke-Wulf_Fw_61
     
  6. Mar 2, 2019 #6

    TFF

    TFF

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    Autogyros do not like turning with the blade direction; rpm slows. Rpm slows and lift drops. Single rotor, you would compensate by pulling the nose up a little more. Two rotors would roll into the turn. Perfect design might not be a problem. Then you have size. It’s not going to be a compact design. Monitoring rotor rpm and pre spinning two blades for takeoff is going to be very important. A friend duffed a takeoff in his raf and ended up on the street outside the airport because of low rpm. He did get to drive it back through the gate. People have experimented with wings on helicopters to take the load off the blades for speed and I believe some of the Pitcairns had ailerons, but what you really end up with is two systems fighting against each other. The RC gyros work pretty good because they spin the blades pretty fast. Lots more excess lift that scaling it up can make.
     

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