Sealing crankcase halves.

Discussion in 'Firewall Forward / Props / Fuel system' started by PTAirco, Sep 11, 2019.

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  1. Sep 13, 2019 #21

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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    I have never seen that. Have they started doing that?
     
  2. Sep 13, 2019 #22

    cgifly2

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    8CCAC6F3-4F9A-4B83-844B-CAAB4164FB3E.jpeg I have been working on everything from Weedwackers to aircraft over 45 years. And have used it all. But a friend of mine who worked on wind turbines for a very large company, turned me on to the ONLY thing I use now. The German wind turbine company specify only one brand. Bare in mind we are talking about a million dollar turbine. This stuff is called “the right stuff” and it is! This is Permatex’s version it’s formula is the same. About 20$
     
  3. Sep 13, 2019 #23

    akwrencher

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    Ultra black is one of my go to sealants. It's the best of the bunch for hot oil, I feel. Ultra grey is great for machines surfaces that have a lot of pressure. Good judgment is essential of course when applying, so as not to leave gobs in the engine. I've seen many instances of over doing it. My main complaint with these products is getting it back off again. Especially on aluminum surfaces, which scratch easily. It is pretty good stuff though. I am going to order some Hypalon and try that, sounds like good stuff as well.
     
  4. Sep 13, 2019 #24

    Turd Ferguson

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    Ultra black is what Ford specified for the oil pan and timing cover on the 2.3 Duratec engine in my Ranger. Since I put the engine back in, hasn't leaked a drop of any kind of fluid.
     
  5. Sep 13, 2019 #25

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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  6. Sep 13, 2019 #26

    PTAirco

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    Wow. So many opinions on what's best. Based on everything I heard, I'll go with Loctite 515 and no thread. Especially since it's on Continental's list of approved crankcase sealants. I agree, I would stay away from silicon-based sealants. And likely, the thread thickness would cause no problem whatsoever in the A-65, but plain 515 it is. Thanks for your input everybody. $24 from Aircraft Spruce for 50 ml or you can buy it for twice that from TCM!
     
  7. Sep 13, 2019 #27

    Toobuilder

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    If you go to the Ly-Con web site they show some picture of the process. Essentially they CNC one half of the case and lay a "worm" of oring in the groove.
     
  8. Sep 13, 2019 #28

    Dan Thomas

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    In the Continental lubricants and sealants bulletin I posted the link for, the crankcase sealing and threading instructions start on page 12.
     
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  9. Sep 13, 2019 #29

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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  10. Sep 14, 2019 #30

    Dan Thomas

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    Ah. Ly-Con, the overhaulers, not the Lyc or Conti manufacturers. I didn't see anything like that in the parts manuals when I was maintaining them.

    It's a really good idea, like Ross's Lyc rocker covers that use an O-ring. I hope the manufacturers will adopt this.
     
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  11. Sep 14, 2019 #31

    TFF

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    Lycoming does it from the factory as an option. It can be added to overhauls from them too.
     
  12. Sep 15, 2019 #32

    PMD

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    In the far distant past, I was a VW mechanic, and later went on to build hundreds of high perf engines. We used something we called "Gootoo" which, IIRC was VW G200 or something like that. NEVER had a case seam or cam plug leak...ever. Also, super easy to clean up during rebuilds (which it seems we did an awful lot in those days).

    Today, I use "Right Stuff" for most things (as it is similar to what VW sells for about $70 Cdn a small squeeze tube. We work on multi-million dollar, very large oil filled devices with some fairly exotic sealing systems as they must be perfectly vacuum tight (in which I specialize) and when the mega-buck stuff doesn't work, I use Right Stuff.

    Still, NO sealing paste can possibly work as well as a properly designed O-ring, but design and material selection for that is actually a fairly involved process. Fortunately, the information is easily available.
     
  13. Sep 15, 2019 #33

    AdrianS

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    Which is why I pay Toyota's tax for their genuine FIPG (form in place gasket) seal on my Toyota engine / gearbox. And use both kinds, because they list different sealant for gearbox and engine. I assume the manufacturer knows what they're doing.
    And my life doesn't even depend on it.
     

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