Flap failure today

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autoreply

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Jul 7, 2009
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10,732
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Rotterdam, Netherlands
Agree, I like the old "Johnson bar" flap lever. Only negatives are that the student is able to go to zero flaps instantly when it may not be safe to do so, and also the failure if the ratcheting latch mechanism may also allow the flaps to go to zero unexpectedly.
Some sailplanes have a provision for that. Engaging -7 to +10 flaps is fwd/aft. Then you move the lever left and you can engage +10 to landing setting. Going from landing to negative (cruise) requires moving fwd, moving right and moving fwd again. Pretty much fool-proof and there's no added complexity to the flap (lever).
 

Vision_2012

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Joined
Apr 21, 2010
Messages
274
Location
Shady Cove, OR
My instructor started messing with the flap control switch trying to get the flaps up but they had failed and jammed in the full-down position.
Your instructor is trying to kill you!
You are flying the plane, setting trim for the flap setting and he is monkeying with the switch?
Crazy!!
What if he retracted the flaps as you were about to flare?
Crash!!

One person flys and the other instructs or observes. Hands off the levers and knobs.
--or perhaps he stopped messing with the flap control switch and you didn't tell us.
 

Titanium Cranium

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Dec 28, 2010
Messages
86
Location
Dayton, OH
Yeah, by the time I was about to turn final he stopped trying to get the flaps to come up. I was carefully watching my airspeed and was ready in case the flaps did retract so we wouldn't stall or lose much altitude at all. By the time I was about to turn final he felt that I had the airplane and was doing fine so he sat back and watched to see how I did.
 

Dan Thomas

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Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5,079
Wow that sounds like quite an experience. I was told that the plane is fixed now and it turned out to be a bad switch. It was the type that is a large paddle switch that stays at the top (retracted position) and is moved down to the first notch which is 10 degrees, then you move it to the side about 1-2mm and push it down to the next notch, which is 20 degrees and the same thing to reach 30 degrees. The switch was positioned at the 10 degree notch but they fully extended. When my instructor was fiddling around with the switch putting it in every position possible, the flaps still just stayed at full.
There was a broken microswitch on that lever behind the panel, then. They do that. Or perhaps the up-stop microswitch on the jackscrew got a bunch of oil in it; they're bad for that, too, when mechanics over-oil the mechanism.

Dan
 

Dan Thomas

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Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5,079
Your instructor is trying to kill you!
You are flying the plane, setting trim for the flap setting and he is monkeying with the switch?
Crazy!!
What if he retracted the flaps as you were about to flare?
Crash!!
Not really. The flaps make most of their lift at 20 degrees; at 30 or 40 they're making mostly drag. There's only one or two kts difference in stall speed between 20 and 40, too. If full flaps were out it takes some time to pass through the 20 degree point and by that time the airplane is on the ground anyway.

Dan
 

Southron

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Joined
May 4, 2012
Messages
86
Location
Eatonton
Heck, back in the mid-1960's I was attending Burnside-Ott Aviation Academy at the Opa Locka, Florida airport. I was out in an old school C-150 that had the "old fashioned" flap control, a lever (with a button on top) between the seats that deployed and retracted the flaps manually.

I was about 50 miles away from the airport, out over the 'Glades practicing my "Slow Flight" maneuvers. After a while, flying slow with Full Flaps I decided it was time to head back to the airport. OOPS! I could NOT get the button on top of the flap lever to depress. I did everything, including taking off my shoe and beating the button....all to no avail. Frustration....Frustration...Frustration. There was no way I could get the flaps up.

So....it was a L-O-N-G, S-L-OW flight back to the airport with Full Flaps. No problem landing though, Runway 9 Left at Opa Locka was so long I had no problem sitting the airplane down with a lot of unused runway to spare!!!
 

Nickathome

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Sep 29, 2009
Messages
758
Location
S.E. PA
Yep, I agree.....A few times I've done T&G's and forget to raise the flaps when I throttled back up. Other than climbing out a little slower I had no trouble maintaining the climb and trim of the aircraft. ......Now my 150 can go to 40deg of flap and I normally don't even use that setting, so can't comment on a 40 degree climbout.
 
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