EAA No Longer Has Free SolidWorks

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Voidhawk9

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Aye aye, there are a lot of good tutorials out there for sure.
But something 'official' EAA that after some basics showed how to create some things that would be common to EAAers, along with someone to reach out to perhaps, would focus the community?
 
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Bothell, WA USA
Good morning. For what it is worth, I see that Maker Campus is offering a free 'beginner's' course on FreeCad, described below.

In this course, we’ll draw household items as we learn the basics of FreeCAD. This means we’ll measure real world components, then work through the process of drawing them precisely in two and three dimensions. The result can be a DXF file ready for laser cutting or an STL file ready for 3D printing.


[email protected]
 

Stuffengineer

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Apr 7, 2020
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Not sure if this has been posted but this company produces some great YouTube videos for FreeCad and most other CAD software platforms.
 

berridos

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madrid
over the years i just have changed too many times the cad software i use, and at the end, i am not really profeccient in any of the cad offerings. The one i liked most was catia, but maybe because at that time i was young and had a fresh head, or maybe because a licence costs above 50000 bucks.
I am tired of switching. I will take the route uphill with freeecad and openfoam and see where it ends. Last time i installed openfoam on my pc, my pc stopped working for two weeks because microsoft did some sabotage while installing the linux emulator required.
We shouldnt give up, and once we manage to overcome the common hurdles, donate a bit to softwares like freecade and openfoam.
Bsides the cfd of solidworks is just a useless tool.
 

rv7charlie

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Question for those of you that are running FreeCAD. For beginner to 'sophomoric' level stuff, what level of Windows computing power & video card power is usable? Not 'instant gratification', but reasonable functionality. Would a typical quad-core, built-in video, 16GB memory, with solid state drive, be adequate? Or the same, but with a couple $hundred worth of video card?

Thanks,
Charlie
 

Stuffengineer

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You can now get the first year of Solidworks for Makers for $79.20 and it includes the NC Shop Floor Programmer.
What I don't like is the need for a SOLIDWORKS certified computer ($3,000) is needed to run it. SOLIDWORKS itself will run on many lesser computers.
 

sming

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Apr 10, 2019
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Would a typical quad-core, built-in video, 16GB memory, with solid state drive, be adequate? Or the same, but with a couple $hundred worth of video card.
Hi, I ran freecad without problem on my (now dead) 10 years old Sandy bridge laptop dual core (so like 1.8ghz). So you're good. Not sure why you think you need a powerful graphic card? Games are so detailed nowadays and need such monsters that almost anything else is trivial.
 

KeithO

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The main criteria would be a 64 bit system, supporting open GL on the graphics, 32Gb of ram should be fine. SSD is obviously faster than a physical HDD. Thats about it.
 

rv7charlie

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Not sure why you think you need a powerful graphic card?
I didn't *think* that; I was *asking* about that. ;-) Some of the other CAD packages do require a lot of computing and video processing horsepower; I'm just trying to get a handle on what FreeCad would require. Good to know that I won't need to sell a kidney, if I decide to dive into CAD.

Thanks for the info.
 

KeithO

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I think you can get by with something in the $750 range (for Solid works), not including the monitor, which are cheaper than they have ever been.

I didn't *think* that; I was *asking* about that. ;-) Some of the other CAD packages do require a lot of computing and video processing horsepower; I'm just trying to get a handle on what FreeCad would require. Good to know that I won't need to sell a kidney, if I decide to dive into CAD.

Thanks for the info.
 

Voidhawk9

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Timaru, NZ
No need to guess. From the FreeCAD FAQ:
What are the prerequisites for running FreeCAD?

In contrast to most 3D CAD software, FreeCAD can run smoothly on the most modest computers - it's been known to run on Pentium IV and Intel Core2 Solo CPUs. If your computer is running a current operating system, chances are FreeCAD will run. The only prerequisite is that your graphics card or chipset must support OpenGL, preferably no older than v2.0.
 
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