Box and Pan Brake

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PMD

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Joined
Apr 11, 2015
Messages
1,101
Location
Martensville SK
This part is fascinating! Never knew that.

During late teens, i spent time in an old Danish machinist's shop. (Same man who introduced me to EAA) I was oohing and aahing over the machines one day and he said WTTE "Son, the machines don't mean anything without tooling. Best machine in the world is useless without good accessories and tooling to facilitate the work.
Here is a source for roller bottom dies: RVP65-2 - Rolla-V - Rolleri S.p.A.
I learned the machine shop side from a retired Canadian Army sergeant with no fewer than 5 trades tickets, but my go-to guy later was a old Dane who made his mark rebuilding machine tools. Talented beyond belief and could do incredible precision work with the simplest of machine tools (all rebuilt by him, of course). When he retired, I was out of town, but my wife got to his sale and bought a milling machine for me to have a piece of history. Sadly, sale was at a super lull in economy and I doubt he got 10 cents on the dollar for what his stuff was worth. Had I been there I would have come home with several things. Modern CNC stuff can do some marvellous things, but the skills to repair the mechanical stuff are few and far between.
 

Aviacs

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Joined
Oct 21, 2019
Messages
412
That is really cool.
Unfortunately i misunderstood your earlier description - imagined it was something that rolled along the length of the part and progressively formed the sheet metal into a die. IOW put a roller on the toolslide , die on the table with material over and feed the table longways as the roller pressed the form. It was hard to picture doing without distortion, but they do magic these days with old processes.

AFA the reality, Can't do this on a planer. It is still a press operation. but very interesting.





Your wife sounds like mine - keepers.
When i was working in the plant with the press brakes described earlier, it was during a move, before getting my shop moved across 2 states to where we had. Essentially making minimum wage and occasionally running back and forth to move machines on the weekends. After beingthere long enough (2 weeks?) to get first check, i got home and my wife had cut out an ad from the newspaper & put it on my plate, advertising machine tools from a shop surplus. :)

I've rescraped many of the machines and tooling here. OTOH i seldom waste time on paint. So it does not impress anyone :)

smt
 

PMD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2015
Messages
1,101
Location
Martensville SK
Your wife sounds like mine - keepers.

I've rescraped many of the machines and tooling here. OTOH i seldom waste time on paint. So it does not impress anyone :)
kept for 52 years come Monday

I have similar addiction to oldies but goodies in tooling. Forgot, she also got a Marvel 8 bandsaw from Frank. I have started to switch from my old mostly single phase tooling to more industrial 600V stuff. This spring managed to score a Colchester 15 x 50 Variable Speed that will need the ways tidied up before it lands in the new shop. Still need larger mill, press brake, shear and iron worker to round it all out.
 

Fiberglassworker

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Joined
May 28, 2021
Messages
109
These days you do not know the source of the tooling you are buying. Some 15 years ago a sheet metal shop I was working in needed a 10-00 ' hand brake. They had a choice of 2 brakes a relatively cheap Chinese hand brake or a D&K handbrake for a lot more money they went for the Dries and Krump. The tool arrived, wiping the cos Molene off we came across a stamped note on one of the end frames, "Made in China".
 

Geraldc

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Joined
Nov 12, 2011
Messages
860
Location
nz
I made a short rollavee bottom die at a place I worked.
Cut it out in segments on a waterjet .
We used it to make some brackets like this without distorting ends or holes.
1656980373502.png
 

PMD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2015
Messages
1,101
Location
Martensville SK
These days you do not know the source of the tooling you are buying. Some 15 years ago a sheet metal shop I was working in needed a 10-00 ' hand brake. They had a choice of 2 brakes a relatively cheap Chinese hand brake or a D&K handbrake for a lot more money they went for the Dries and Krump. The tool arrived, wiping the cos Molene off we came across a stamped note on one of the end frames, "Made in China".
You can make anything in China as well as you can over here - you just MUST provide your own QA/QC constantly - otherwise things will "drift" constantly away from design. While the US was delighted to start playing ping-pong with China, the Germans were going in and getting involved in industry - thus some well established relationships that go WAY back. That is why VW was the first really big player on the scene in the '90s.
 
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