PILOT WEIGHTS TODAY?

Discussion in 'General Experimental Aviation Questions' started by Armilite, Oct 5, 2018.

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Pilot Weight Categories

Poll closed Nov 19, 2018.
  1. 140-160

    8 vote(s)
    12.5%
  2. 161-180

    12 vote(s)
    18.8%
  3. 181-200

    14 vote(s)
    21.9%
  4. 201-220

    16 vote(s)
    25.0%
  5. 221-240

    8 vote(s)
    12.5%
  6. 241-260

    3 vote(s)
    4.7%
  7. 261-280

    2 vote(s)
    3.1%
  8. 281-300

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  9. 301-350

    1 vote(s)
    1.6%
  10. 351-370

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  11. 371+

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  12. 140-160

    8 vote(s)
    12.5%
  13. 161-180

    12 vote(s)
    18.8%
  14. 181-200

    14 vote(s)
    21.9%
  15. 201-220

    16 vote(s)
    25.0%
  16. 221-240

    8 vote(s)
    12.5%
  17. 241-260

    3 vote(s)
    4.7%
  18. 261-280

    2 vote(s)
    3.1%
  19. 281-300

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  20. 301-350

    1 vote(s)
    1.6%
  21. 351-370

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  22. 371+

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Oct 6, 2018 #21

    Derswede

    Derswede

    Derswede

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    Well, that may be so, but divorce is not one of those ways. A friend just got divorced, the old saying about "love is grand, but divorce is 10 grand" was off by about $750,000.

    Derswede
     
  2. Oct 6, 2018 #22

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Well, regardless of who gained how much weight and why (I've got my share), I find it interesting that 160-240 lb/73-109 kg covers 30 of 38 respondents, which is pretty good. So, with apologies to the very big or very small guys and gals, it looks like a minimum pilot weight (where that matters, usually in pusher designs) of 65 kg and a max pilot weight of 115 kg would cover almost everyone.

    The VP-2 approach of a bench seat for two side-by-side but narrow enough for a solo pilot to straddle the stick and use the outer rudder pedals on each side is a great way to make a single design pretty much all-inclusive. Pilot and passenger weight must total no more that X, which means that big pilots can only take kids up for a ride, and the biggest pilots just fly solo.

    File_000.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
  3. Oct 6, 2018 #23

    Pops

    Pops

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    Thanks for straightening me up on that. Also my wife says she likes the way you think. So basically with a wife you are building around the SS check and not a data plate that was not issued. Got-it.


    My buddy Dallas built a JR Ace several years ago and it has a bench seat with the stick in the middle where 2 smaller people can set side by side or the pilot seats in the middle. I like that idea.
     
  4. Oct 6, 2018 #24

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    I sort of decided a while back that should I market a plane, 250lbs is a reasonable upper weight for a solo pilot, 450lb for 2 people and baggage. I have been a little over 250 myself, but I fixed that as i didn't like it. 450 would just about take my current 6'6" frame and that of any of my 6'6" relatives.
     
  5. Oct 6, 2018 #25

    dcstrng

    dcstrng

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    I blew through the FAA weight when I was in the 8th grade (7th, actually) and have been at least 30% above it all through a military career and into "retirement" these past 30 years... there are some tiny, petite folks out there, but I ain't one of them... only had one spouse that small as well (and no porkers thank you very much...), but oh well...
     
  6. Oct 7, 2018 #26

    Pops

    Pops

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    The JMR Special can take full fuel and a 300 lb pilot and no baggage, or a 250 lb pilot and 40 lbs of baggage. I have the seat set up for a 6' 3" pilot and me at 6' will need a thick cushion behind my back. Room to move seat back 2" for someone taller than 6' 3". Not easy designing a small airplane for a big pilot. The fuselage is 28" wide and can be made 30" wide without any structure problems.
     
  7. Oct 7, 2018 #27

    lr27

    lr27

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    Cut at the neck and replace everything below. Then cut at the neck and replace everything above. New model. But you should go first to provide a good example. ;-) In my own case, it would probably be best to keep most of the brain and replace everything else. Or keep the forebrain too, if it can be repaired.

    On a cramped aircraft, straddling the pedals would be possible. On a real two placer, I think it might be a problem. At least for me. I have short legs and wide shoulders. I have trouble with headroom too, though obviously not on a VP2!
     
  8. Oct 7, 2018 #28

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    It'll be a dimensional issue for pilots wider than myself in my Hurricane. The plan is to have a fixed seat fit me perfectly. Some bits of styrofoam stashed somewhere will pad it for mere mortals. I couldn't make a moveable seat for the weight of the styro, whch doesn't even have to be carried on the plane. It will also add some extra spine protection for crashes.

    Small people with a balance problem could be accomodated by having water ballast. Empty gallon milk jugs don't weigh much. On my design, that would be in the tail, so I shouldn't need much. Forward cgs aren't the problem that rearward ones are.
    I also like the idea of water ballast in the tail for cg and spin testing, it is easily and safely jettisonable with a suitable mechanism. I've read enough reports of test pilots struggling to get out of rearward cg spins to want jettisonable tail ballast.
     
  9. Oct 7, 2018 #29

    Daleandee

    Daleandee

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    That's the way it works in my Sonex with the center stick. It's actually quite fun to sit center seat & use the out side rudder pedals. This makes watching your six a bit easier and the view is more copacetic out of the large bubble canopy. Yep ... more fighter like. Still, I mostly fly from the left seat. Easier to reach the controls for throttle, mixture, carb heat, transponder, GPS, flaps, & trim. I can haul a couple of FAA sized people (or a bit larger) with full fuel and a little bit of baggage.
     
  10. Oct 7, 2018 #30

    gtae07

    gtae07

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    I was FAA-standard weight when I graduated high school. By the end of my first semester of college, I was at 200 and climbing.

    However, since August 1 I have lost 24 lb and in another week or two I'll pass 190 coming down and be the lightest I've been since sometime that semester. I may be able to hit 180 just in time for Thanksgiving; not sure what I'll do from there.

    No big trick to it; I changed what I'm eating a bit (more protein, less carbs) and eat a little less, and get some exercise every day. The Fitbit certainly helps track things though.
     
  11. Oct 7, 2018 #31

    BJC

    BJC

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    They must have significantly improved the culinary options between ‘70 and ‘07.


    BJC
     
  12. Oct 7, 2018 #32

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Perhaps it was a liquid diet.... :gig:

     
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  13. Oct 7, 2018 #33

    BJC

    BJC

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    Good point. I'll assume that that is the reason unless '07 denies it.


    BJC
     
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  14. Oct 7, 2018 #34

    Toobuilder

    Toobuilder

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    No trick indeed. STOP eating the now typical high carb, worthless calorie American diet. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Get your hormones in line (thyroid and Testosterone, in particular).
     
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  15. Oct 7, 2018 #35

    gtae07

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    Well sort of. They had some decent options (Diane's omelettes were awesome, in Brittain dining hall of all places!) and some nearby restaurants that were good at the time, but it's more just that I have a weakness for free food (or, in the case of dining halls and buffets, unlimited food at a sitting). Combine that with significantly reduced physical activity--I was riding a bike 20 miles/day in hilly terrain every day in high school, and stopped doing that in college--and there you have it.

    The diet adjustment wasn't even a huge change. For me it's mainly just eating slower and less, and learning to stop eating when I stop feeling hungry rather than when I feel full.

    The rest is trading my rice-and-black-beans lunch for chicken wraps and the breakfast sandwiches for mini egg muffins (eggs, turkey sausage, peppers, cheese). I never drank full-sugar cokes or sweet tea, rarely ate snacky foods, skip the free doughnuts at work, etc. The hard part is still that I'm a sucker for free food, and for things like bread, pasta, or chips and salsa; resisting the free meeting leftovers etc. at work is a major willpower test. Seeing the calorie counter does help resist that though.

    We go to the gym four days a week; on work days I at least walk for half an hour and if I'm feeling froggy I'll get up at 0400 and go run before work. We never take elevators if there's a choice.

    In the end I'm running a daily calorie deficit of 1000-1500 or so to lose the weight. That's three meals that leave me sated, and even then I usually have room in the budget for a small dessert and a beer or glass of wine. I don't feel the massive hunger that I used to.



    It's not for everyone, and maybe some people don't need it to have good success... but I really think having some kind of advanced activity tracker plus an easy-to-use food tracking app has made a big difference and it was well worth what I paid for it. Being able to put numbers to things is good for an engineer.
     
  16. Oct 7, 2018 #36

    dougwanderson

    dougwanderson

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    build/maintain muscle eat complex carb stay away from juice, beer, donuts and to much faty meat. stop eating when full drink water. me 6.2 185lbs
     
  17. Oct 7, 2018 #37

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    Eat food, not junk, and you'll gravitate towards a healthy weight.
    Walking past free doughnuts is a tough one for me too.
    I eat plenty of fatty meat. Drink unsweet tea.
    Breakfast is usually a tin of oily fish (currenty herring), which sates me for hours.
     
  18. Oct 7, 2018 #38

    gtae07

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    I should add that the guy sitting next to me at work (also a pilot) has lost 120 pounds in the last year and something by simply eating better and exercising (he also lost 140 or so by jettisoning his cheating ex-wife...). He's now light enough that he can go do glider training and take multiple people up in a 172.

    There's also a mechanic downstairs that has lost almost 200 pounds, but that's with "sleeve" surgery and a keto diet.



    Moderation is the key, it seems. Deny yourself those things completely and you may crave them; exercise enough that you can have it occasionally (or often, in small amounts) and you don't even feel bad about it. Knowing the numbers on what you're eating can also help you build in room for special days like birthdays, holidays, or brewery tours with the guys.
     
  19. Oct 7, 2018 #39

    robertl

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    KETO will do it !
    Bob
     
  20. Oct 7, 2018 #40

    BJC

    BJC

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    Brittian was known as “Ptomaine Hall” when I was there. In three years, I probably ate there fewer than ten times. Junior’s Grill was a favorite (Junior retired long ago) for supper, as was the T Room. Lunch was usually a sandwich in the student union, on the hill, not the newer area to the west. I ran track two of the three years there, so I burned lots of calories, and weighed 167 pounds when I graduated.


    GTAE70
     

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