More on riveting

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by John, Mar 3, 2003.

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  1. Mar 3, 2003 #1

    John

    John

    John

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    I just finished riveting the tail-cone section of my Mustang II. One thing I keep noticing on more and more metal airplanes is the way the sheet metal has been dented by the force of the rivet gun, from the outside, on the curves of the fuselage. I just spent about four hours inside the tail-cone "back-riveting". It came out simply beautiful. If you want to eliminate those unsightly dimples in the skins, practice your back-riveting, get a good helper (Mine is an RV6A builder) and do as much as you can from the inside. I use rivet tape or 3M masking tape over the tops of the flush rivets to eliminate bucking bar or rivet set marks on the skins and rivet heads.
    Back riveting takes a little practice, but the results are well worth the effort.
     
  2. Feb 17, 2004 #2

    StRaNgEdAyS

    StRaNgEdAyS

    StRaNgEdAyS

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    An interesting tip:D
    I've seen a few of those marks you are talking about, they are particularly noticeable on the polished metal planes.
     
  3. Mar 21, 2004 #3

    Davefl42

    Davefl42

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    Don't press so hard on the rivit gun, only enough pressure to keep the gun in place, and if using universal head rivits only enough pressure to keep from jumping of the rivit head. Takes lots of practive.
     
  4. Jun 27, 2004 #4

    Brwood

    Brwood

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    Manual dexterity comes into play here. I have a neighbor who buit an RV-4 in his garage. Really thin skins on the tail (.016 I think). When he was done you would swear the plane was made of composite, smoothest metal I have ever seen. It helps that one of his partners is a professional sheet metal mechanic, and the other partner is talented in a vast array of skills.

    brwood
     

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