Hazardous Material

Discussion in 'Finishing Techniques' started by sonex293, Apr 12, 2006.

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  1. Apr 12, 2006 #1

    sonex293

    sonex293

    sonex293

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    I’m looking at painting an all aluminum airplane project myself. Why? Just because I can!

    I don’t mind working with the hazardous materials and will take appropriate actions to limit personal exposure, but what I can’t find is how to control material runoff.

    The plane is a 6061-T6 aluminum and I plan to acid etch, rinse, alodine, rinse, and then paint. Since I’ve never done this, I wonder how much runoff there is and should I be concerned? This will be done on property that is still using a well for home water. Any one have photos on how you handled this problem?

    Any and all advice will be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Michael
    :confused:

    p.s. I’ve noticed PreKote chemical in Aircraft Spruce’s catalog, but since it’s new I’m not sure how good it is. Its milspec, but I’m not sure that really means much!
     
  2. Apr 12, 2006 #2

    Captain_John

    Captain_John

    Captain_John

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    Michael,

    We Arrvee guys are moving towards self etching primer and away from the conversion coatings because of this reason. Compound this and recent tests by the Air Force stating that protecting the substrate with a coating exceeds conversion coatings and you get a win/win.

    Corrosion protection: A durable barrier between the substrate and the environment.

    A primer does just this. I chose DuPont VariPrime. I like it! I may just switch over to their side line, Nason for the rest of my project. It is less costly and worthy of the experiment.

    :D CJ
     
  3. Apr 15, 2006 #3

    sonex293

    sonex293

    sonex293

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  4. Apr 15, 2006 #4

    Captain_John

    Captain_John

    Captain_John

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    Yup, you can skip all that old fashioned stuff entirely!

    Weight difference is negligible. The entire RV (larger than a Sonex) I expect will consume 1 gallon of VariPrime on the interior portions of the project. A gallon may go a dozen pounds or so I guess.

    I am up here in New England, so I am coating the ENTIRE interior of ALL the parts.

    If I were inland I would only coat the surfaces that contact each other. This would mitigate any smoking rivets and corrosion points.

    :D CJ
     
  5. Apr 16, 2006 #5

    wally

    wally

    wally

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    And keep in mind all those general aviation airplanes like my 1969 Cessna 150. They were built with 2024-T3 Alclad and had absolutly NO primer or other protection on the inside.

    And my C-150 still looks ok on the inside after 36 years.

    Granted they are not structural parts but on the sheet aluminum and other aluminum parts on my Pitts project, I am using spray can self-etching primer from the auto parts store. I am then putting a finish coat on that. It seems to work and stick very well. At first I tried some of the regular spray can primer but found after a while, it would pop and flake off with a little scratch/ding. The self-etiching stuff stays on. Check back in 30 or so years and we can see how it (and me too) is holding up!
    Wally
     

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