Folding wings without disconnecting controls?

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cluttonfred

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Sockmonkey

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The Beaver, takes-off at 60, fly's at 60, and lands at 60.
A pou-type would have a lower landing speed and possibly STOL ability.
The big croses flea design proves the good load hauling capacityas a 180hp six seater so why there is no 4 seater flea design? Why are there mostly single seat and some two seater fleas.
IIRC in one case it was because certification requires they test spin recovery and they couldn't get it to spin.
 

cluttonfred

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That was the Croses 3-seater B-EC-7 Tout Terrain which they wanted to certify for use as a little medical evacuation aircraft. I believe the rear turtledeck was hinged or removable for loading a litter. They were caught in a Catch 22 of needing to demonstrate spin recovery in an aircraft that wouldn't stall or spin the conventional sense. They considered hanging it on a swivel beneath a big helicopter but never tried it.



The Para-Cargo was supposed to be used to carry parachutists but when they wanted to trial it the French CAA inspector said the struts forward of the door were a hazard. Go figure.

 

saini flyer

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That was the Croses 3-seater B-EC-7 Tout Terrain which they wanted to certify for use as a little medical evacuation aircraft. I believe the rear turtledeck was hinged or removable for loading a litter. They were caught in a Catch 22 of needing to demonstrate spin recovery in an aircraft that wouldn't stall or spin the conventional sense. They considered hanging it on a swivel beneath a big helicopter but never tried it.

Wow, 90Hp three seater. This is already a 2+2 with a long turtledeck storage.
Whats the reason for dual wheel main gear and using identical tail wheel too. This design could be simplified/moedrnized and made slimmer(only in weight, not in waist) :D... folding wing STOL workhorse that doesnt stall or spin......

Matthew, thanks for sharing.
 

cluttonfred

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The large tailwheel integral with the rudder was a signature Croses design element. The four-wheel main gear was for rough and soft field operations. The single wooden “spring” arch was later changed to two to allow independent movement of front and rear main wheels.

 

Riggerrob

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Heh
That was the Croses 3-seater B-EC-7 Tout Terrain which they wanted to certify for use as a little medical evacuation aircraft. I believe the rear turtledeck was hinged or removable for loading a litter. They were caught in a Catch 22 of needing to demonstrate spin recovery in an aircraft that wouldn't stall or spin the conventional sense. They considered hanging it on a swivel beneath a big helicopter but never tried it.



The Para-Cargo was supposed to be used to carry parachutists but when they wanted to trial it the French CAA inspector said the struts forward of the door were a hazard. Go figure.

 

Sockmonkey

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The large tailwheel integral with the rudder was a signature Croses design element. The four-wheel main gear was for rough and soft field operations. The single wooden “spring” arch was later changed to two to allow independent movement of front and rear main wheels.
I love the integral tailwheel rudder.
The other feature that I love, (aside from the safe handling) is that the way the wings are positioned means they don't obstruct the door which makes getting into it feel exactly the same as getting into a car.

The four-wheel main gear, while practical, probably should have been left off the original for the sake of looking normal.
It already had one major unusual feature in being a pou-type so adding a second oddball feature probably put the conservative officials off a bit.
 

Riggerrob

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That French CAA Inspector had his mind firmly imbedded in ..... er ....... the previous generation of jump-planes!
Picture a Pilates Porter or Cessna 182 with the student jumper standing on the step/main gear leg - facing forward - while grasping the wing strut with both hands. The old method of exit was always a “work around” to avoid colliding with the wheel 1/100 th of a second after exit!
Hah!
Hah!
Para-Cargo wing struts are awkward for the old method of instruction.
Funny how most instructors and students found the old exit method awkward!
That wing strut is too steep for the more recent versions of “hanging exits” now favoured for static-line and IAD students.

Yes, it is possible for a clumsy student to face-plant on the MLG, but that requires a vigorous push FORWARD!
Lazy students just get blown away from the strut.

If a skydiving school wanted to revive Croses’ Para-Cargo, the best skydiving exit hatch would be a hole in the floor ... the second best a side door under the rear wing .... and third best the prototype’s door.
 

Riggerrob

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Returning to the OP’s question about folding fleas ...
Parasols (e.g. front wing on Pou de Ciel) should be easy to pivot (ala. Backyard Flyer and CV-22 Osprey VTOL tilt-rotor) just by slacking structural cables.

Swage two “stop” fittings (Nico-Press, ripcord ball, etc.) onto each cabane structural cable. The middle fitting locks into the bottom of a cabane strut for flight.
Cabane struts are hinged at both ends and “collapse in a predictable manner” when structural “stops” are released. The “end” cable stop swages limit travel when the top wing is stowed along the top of the fuselage.
The mono-block, cantilever top wing eliminates two sets of heavy, precise, expensive (flip up) fold fittings.
Double length structural cables never need to be dis-connected, reducing the risk of miss-assembly.

To erect for flight, pull on cable ends until they click into flight configuration .... er .... looks like an airplane. Double-check control-throws and structural locks before take-off. Brightly-coloured structural locks on the front deck - or instrument panel - would be easy to confirm before take-off.
Control cables never need to die-connect because they just float (in cable guides) along cabane struts).
 

Chris Huxley

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The S2F Traker wing fold mechanism has a nice control disconnect for the ailerons and gust lock. In the leading edge is the aileron disconnect, when the wings come together the outer quadrant pivot nests into the inner quadrant and the pivots of the two are aligned. When they are set up properly there is no clearance between the arms of the quadrants in the down and locked position and the quadrants move together in unison.
The gust lock quadrants are similar but the pivots are not together and some differential movements happen between the two quadrants, probably due to the intermittent use control like a gust lock. There are roller bearings in between the two to help with the friction.
 

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