Deuces Wild Takes To The Skies!

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Craig

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
On Saturday, April 23, 2005, Deuces Wild, NX96CW, made a successful First FLight.

Piloted by Les Benson, of Alfa Charters, the Wilcox-Bakeng Duce took off at a little past 10:30 am, climbing away from North Palm Beach County Airport (F45) at better than 1,500 feet per minute.

Pilot Les reported that the airplane was "the best set-up and flying airplane of it's type" that he had ever experienced.

Powered by a Lycoming O-290-D which had been balanced, had it's camshaft re-ramped, and carb changed to a throttle-body fuel injector, the airplane had little problem on it's maiden voyage.

Power off stall was at 50 mph IAS, full flaps lowered this number to 41 mph IAS. The airplane was very controllable throughout it's full range of flight maneuvers.

The initial flight lasted 2.6 hours.
 

Craig

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Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
pix

Jake - the only pix I've seen so far were from a camera with a 70 mm lens. I'll post some good ones if/when I get tham from the observors.
I did blow one up a bit, and have attached it.
 

Attachments

Falco Rob

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Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
185
Location
Perth, Western Australia
Congrats on a fine job Craig,

It must be absolutely the best to be able to actually fly your creation after all the trials and tribulations of building.

As much as I enjoy the process of building the Falco reading a post like this is so bloody depressing ! !


Ah well, only about 2 years to go . . . sigh . . .:(


Rob
 

Craig

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
No depression

Rob -
Don't be depressed that you have two years to go. The build itself is worth more than most folks imagine.
Here you are - you have something to do every day, you have something to look forward to, something that you enjoy. Think of all those blah people out there with little in the way of activity outside of their work. And even their work is usually some sort of rote stuff - they go through life that way, not knowing that they themselves can pep up their lives.
You have a hobby or pasttime that provides you direction, and a host of people here on the web and in your local EAA chapter who share your enthusiasms. I strongly suspect that, when you are close to finishing this project, you will be thinking of a next project.
Having said that, I seem to be suffering a bit of post-partum blues. Only a few small cosmetic items left on the plane, then just fly the thing.
No more long evenings doing fabric, welding, cutting, bending, figuring out how to make or improve some system or other.
Anyone want me to build them a plane? Aluminum preferred, but would do another tube and rag job like this one!
 

Falco Rob

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Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
185
Location
Perth, Western Australia
Craig,

Just kidding with my last post, I know that you're right !

I have a management role in the engineering industry and before I started building it was a struggle to think about what to do on the weekends to clear my head of work related issues - now I find I have to struggle at work to clear my head of Falco related issues!

I was actually sitting in a meeting today when I suddenly thought of the solution to a problem I was having with fitting the stainless steel firewall . . true story !! (I'm not really always that distracted, but the guy doing the talking at the time was a bit of a drone)

I know a lot of people with "blah" lives as you put it, who don't appear to have any direction. They are no doubt quite happy with their hobbies or pastimes, but I wonder if they know what it's like to be so passionate about something that you will spend thousands of hours and dollars to bring it to life. Come to think of it, I kinda feel sorry for them !

For yourself, I wouldn't be too concerned about getting withdrawal symptoms just yet. From what I've seen of the guys who have completed their projects you've still got many fun-filled hours of fine tuning and tweaking ahead of you to get everything just right . . and of course to ensure this you have to fly it . . . how good can it get!

Cheers,

Rob
 

Sonnyj

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Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
135
Location
Rosman NC USA
Howdy Craig
Man you must be very proud and right you should be.You have accomplished somthing that a lot of folks start and never finish,and that must feel great.Have you flown her yet? I'll bet you can't wait if not!
How many hours do you have it the build?
Well anyway you have done a beautiful job, and I like the rest of us wish you the best with you new addition to your family.
Regards
Sonny
 

Craig

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Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Hours

Sonny -
I have between 3,500 and 4,000 hours in this project. About 4 1/2 years. The plane was actually finished in February, but I had to wait for money to pay the DAR. Actual cash outlay (and all cash, no credit cards, etc.) was about $20,000. My buddy Bob put about $12,000 into the engine.

The plane is absolutely wonderful to fly - the control feel is nice, and all trim systems are dead-on.

Had some fuel pressure problems - the Holley pressure regulator did not have much of a locking mechanism on it. We've double nutted it, and drilled and safety wired it.

Last night Bob was talking about putting on the float bowl from a 1.75" SU carb instead of the pressure regulator - sounded cumbersome to me. I am a firm advocate of keeping it simple! Right now the fuel system is complex enough, with a main tank, wing tank, fuel selector, electric pump, gascolator, mechanical pump, pressure regulator, and aerocarb. But - it starts easily, runs great, and puts out a lot of power.

If the weather is good this weekend, and I scare up some fuel money, I'll put some more hours on it. Want to work on stall speeds (Vso, Vfe), and climb speeds (Vx and Vy).

I'll keep all ya'll postd! BTW - "all ya'll" is the plural of ya'll!!!
 

Craig

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Update

Thanks to Zeno for reminding me.

We got the pressure problems fixed by putting in a return line, and richened it up some.The plane now has 35 hours on it.
Best rate of climb is a tick better than 1800 fpm, at 75 IAS. Best angle is at 71.
I put an aluminum fairing over the frontcockpit, and removed the front windshield for solo X-country flights. That increased the cruise by about 12 mph.
Installed an encoded transponder, did some re-wiring.

The airplane is a blast to fly!
 

gahan

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Joined
Dec 27, 2004
Messages
204
Location
three rivers mi..
congratulations

excuse delay
I do'nt often go to completions, my head is some where else with many pieces coming together on my mini max. many happy flights

reguards

Tom gahan
 

Craig

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Thanks

Thanks, Tom. It has been a fun project. I am making a new windshield right now - the first was too small, and my headset kept getting blown off. Going to try to make Sun'n'Fun next week.
 

Kupo Kupo

Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Messages
18
Location
Florida
I just wanted to say that yours is THE most beautiful open cockpit type I've ever seen, period! I was planning on building a RV-4 for the speed but after seeing yours (I'm not kidding either,) I've decided to go for a Duce instead. My dad had a hanger at F45 with some R22's and an R44 so I was there on many occasions. Wish I had seen you and your plane one of those times. Anyway, amazing quality build and thanks for the influence.
 

Craig

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Thanks - of the eight airplanes that I've built, Deuces Wild was the most challenging, and the most beautiful. She had been a dream of mine since about 1979, and I truly enjoyed the build. I sold her last fall to a fella in Texas, and apparently he is enjoying her now.

Craig
 
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