Bell V280 Valor

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TLAR

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Sep 29, 2020
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319
The boys that hump rucksacks assigned to the 101st (dopes on a rope), in Kentucky, I am 100% certain would like to cruise around in one of these. From my Paratrooper prospective, I would close my eyes and jump out of it.
Can I get a hell ya
 

Marc W

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Mar 31, 2017
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720
Location
Colorado
TLAR, I never made any night jumps unless the sun was down. I heard some people say that all their jumps were night jumps. Were you one of those?

It is interesting how many pilots jump out of airplanes.

1/505, 82nd AB, 1969-1971.
 

TLAR

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Sep 29, 2020
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Marc W
Now you know grunts always have there eyes open lol.
In the 82nd museum I found a great photo, a captain leading his men down to the ground. he was standing in the door both hands on the fuselage ready to jump both eyes closed tightly lol.
No photo credit, but located on ft Bragg at the time was the 5th and 7th SFG, DF headquarters, and of course the Golden Knights.
In order to get that photo you would have to have been free falling pretty close to that C130’s wing tip
 

joe r nelson

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Nov 8, 2019
Messages
7
The Army's new aircraft were completely too complex for the army when I was in. The idea at that time was keeping things simple. The UH-1 was fairly simple so it could be maintained in the field in combat conditions. The V-280 though faster and able to lift more that the old Huey, I really doubt it could be maintained in a field environment. It certainly has the "wow" factor.
 

Marc W

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Mar 31, 2017
Messages
720
Location
Colorado
More than one way to skin a cat! That reminds me of a AF Colonel I met on a C-141. Eight of us parachute qualified types were TDY at Charleston AFB where they were training pilots to drop troops. Two of us would board a C-141 in the middle of the night and fly around for hours over the ocean and then back to Georgia to jump in the afternoon. Tough duty! We stayed in the transient barracks and the NCO club was right across the parking lot. It's a wonder we survived! Of course we were professionals.

Anyway back to the Colonel. There were usually a half dozen Air Force personell with us in the C-141 who rode along in order to qualify for flight pay so we didn't have the whole plane to ourselves. We always heard the old saw about jumping out of perfectly good airplanes. The Colonel had flown B-25's in WWII and also flew combat in Korea. I asked him if he had ever had to jump out of a combat damaged plane. He said no, but he had crashed five of them!
 
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