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How Hot Is Too Hot?

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skydawg

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Jul 26, 2016
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Denver, Colorado
I would check the other items mentioned before swapping out lines. Also, systems normally have return lines wider diameter to lower pressure and increase flow. Stock LS pump is normally 1/2 and 3/4" diameter lines, which is normally sufficient for flow differential. The newer LS models have additional steam ports that are not fully drilled out....you may have one on prop side of engine that would be highest point of water jacket for better burping....but not likely needed if you can evac all the air and make sure the pump bypass port is blocked or fluid won't circulate thru radiator.
 

TXFlyGuy

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Apr 25, 2012
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Republic of Texas
I would check the other items mentioned before swapping out lines. Also, systems normally have return lines wider diameter to lower pressure and increase flow. Stock LS pump is normally 1/2 and 3/4" diameter lines, which is normally sufficient for flow differential. The newer LS models have additional steam ports that are not fully drilled out....you may have one on prop side of engine that would be highest point of water jacket for better burping....but not likely needed if you can evac all the air and make sure the pump bypass port is blocked or fluid won't circulate thru radiator.
The pump is aftermarket. I will upgrade the lines from the pump to the bulkhead from 3/4" to a larger diameter. The main coolant lines are 1 1/8" ID.
There are two steam port locations at the propeller end of the engine. Hutter Performance will drill these out and add lines for bleeding air.
I'll check the pump bypass port, but I verified water is circulating through the radiator by placing my hands in the exhaust scoop and feeling the discharge of hot air.
Thanks.
 
Last edited:

delta

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May 26, 2011
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Location
Brookside Utah
There are numerous people claiming the lack of a thermostat would make an engine run hotter, but regardless of that possibility, it seems the overall function of your efi system would suffer. 2c
 

TXFlyGuy

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Apr 25, 2012
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The above link showed that many claimed that no T-Stat equals a cooler running engine. All T-51’s operate sans thermostat.
 

BJC

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Oct 7, 2013
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97FL, Florida, USA
The above link showed that many claimed that no T-Stat equals a cooler running engine. All T-51’s operate sans thermostat.
Given the load and cooling profile on a liquid cooled aircraft engine without forced radiator airflow, that isn’t a surprise.


BJC
 

rv7charlie

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Nov 17, 2014
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Location
Jackson
Funny thing about that 'mud' link is that the OP had it right, and almost everyone else in that thread...didn't.

TX, once you get the steam ports added to the heads, how are you planning on routing the vapor lines to the swirl pot? They need to be mostly 'up hill' to the pot, and the end in the pot needs to be always submerged in coolant, so that the engine can only draw liquid back from the pot as it cools.

Charlie
 

TXFlyGuy

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Joined
Apr 25, 2012
Messages
1,964
Location
Republic of Texas
Funny thing about that 'mud' link is that the OP had it right, and almost everyone else in that thread...didn't.

TX, once you get the steam ports added to the heads, how are you planning on routing the vapor lines to the swirl pot? They need to be mostly 'up hill' to the pot, and the end in the pot needs to be always submerged in coolant, so that the engine can only draw liquid back from the pot as it cools.

Charlie
I will rely on the expertise of Hutter Performance, as they will perform this procedure.
 
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