Drill press maintenance

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etterre

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2006
Messages
313
Location
St. Louis, MO, USA
I've recently gotten a somewhat neglected drill press working again and I'm wondering about two things:

1. The shaft attached to the chuck has oval cut-out that was once packed with grease. The grease is in need of being flushed out and repacked (I can fish out wood dust), but what short of grease should I use?

2. Where could I find a detailed chart with recommended speeds for various materials? I've got a 1950s vintage copy of the green Machinery's Handbook so I've probably got most of the data, but it's not something that I could just tape to the side...

Thanks!
 

Peter V

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Messages
139
1. The shaft attached to the chuck has oval cut-out that was once packed with grease. The grease is in need of being flushed out and repacked (I can fish out wood dust), but what short of grease should I use?
Are we talking about the cut-out pictured below?

If so, DO NOT GREASE! Your drill has a Morse Taper - the chuck is held-in with friction and removed by hammering a wedge into that hole.
 

etterre

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2006
Messages
313
Location
St. Louis, MO, USA
Are we talking about the cut-out pictured below?

If so, DO NOT GREASE! Your drill has a Morse Taper - the chuck is held-in with friction and removed by hammering a wedge into that hole.
Yep - Apparently the last owner didn't know how the system worked. :dis:
I assumed :emb: that since the chuck was threaded onto the bottom that there was some other purpose to the cutout and that it really should be packed with grease.

Thanks for keeping me from doing something stupid!
 

Peter V

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Messages
139
Great score with the drill!
I guess that means that the chuck has probably never been removed and so the taper is in great condition. Shame tapered bits are getting hard to find these days, so much quicker and sturdier than fiddling with a chuck, to just ram the bit up the shaft.
 
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