Air compressor hose

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by Mike Armstrong, Sep 2, 2008.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Sep 2, 2008 #1

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    near San Diego
    Those with an air compressor, is there a type/brand of air hose that you prefer? How about legnths? I have an Ingersoll Rand 60gal. in a 20 x 23ft. shop. Thanks


    Mike
     
  2. Sep 2, 2008 #2

    expedition2166

    expedition2166

    expedition2166

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2007
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    bainbridge ga
    Goodyear hoses are what I'd recommend if your as bad as me about spilling paint and solvents on them and generally being rough they seem to hold up well I've had mine a few years and besides having to replace the couplings the hose is fine also go with a 3/8 id hose too if you use air hogs like DA sanders and datco sanders and siphon style paint guns the 1/4 hose will work but you want plenty of air supply to your tools and I'd go with a 50 ft hose for maneuvering around you want a good bit of slack and spring for a hose reel too they make rolling he hose up a heck of a lot easier
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2008
  3. Sep 2, 2008 #3

    RonL

    RonL

    RonL

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    456
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Texas
    Glad you ask that question Mike,

    Finding good rubber products today seems to be getting harder.:depressed

    I have both a comment and a question.
    First I have found that Black Magic tire & rubber protectant works great for most rubber, it seems to eliminate most air drying, UV damage. A little messy at application, but when worked into the rubber, then wiped clean, it's not too bad. It really extends the life of rubber.

    The question is, having always heeded the caution of not getting oil on my acetylene tools, how and why is the danger triggered, and if I used this Black Magic on the outside of the hoses, what amount of exposure causes a problem.
    Anyone that knows the facts please speak up, I know the danger, I need to know the WHY:eek:

    Ron
     
  4. Sep 2, 2008 #4

    djschwartz

    djschwartz

    djschwartz

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    982
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    The problem is the pure oxygen. Many substances that burn only mildly in air become explosive in pure oxygen. Some, including most oils, will ignite spontaneously when exposed to pure oxygen. I would never allow anything like what you describe anywhere near my oxygen hoses or welding equipment. If the hoses get worn or dirty, replace them.

    And since these products often have silicones in them, I would also never allow them anywhere near any air system that will be used for painting. Once you get silicone on a surface it is very hard to get rid of. I absolutely hate RTV for that reason. Yes, it does have some real uses but it is over used. I much prefer polyurethane marine caulk for all but high temperature applications.
     
  5. Sep 2, 2008 #5

    RonL

    RonL

    RonL

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    456
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Texas
    Thanks,
    That tells me what I need to know, the Black Magic does have silicone in it, it has a very slippery feel when working it into the rubber, and dragging the hose over something that needs paint would cause a spot that would not hold.

    Back to Mike's OP, I have found that 3/4" air hose with crow foot couplers, for use on the floor and on the ground outside, might be overkill, but will hardly ever need to be replaced. The crow foot couplers are a simple twist lock, and come in pipe thread or barbed fittings. This heavy hose can take a lot of abuse, and carries large air volume to a 20'-50' 1/2" whip hose, or even 1/4" if flex and small volume CFM is needed.

    Ron
     
  6. Sep 2, 2008 #6

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    near San Diego
  7. Sep 2, 2008 #7

    Lee Schaumberg

    Lee Schaumberg

    Lee Schaumberg

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    Hello
    The size of your air compressor is not as is important as your storage tank. Put your compressor some place so you don't have to listen to it. Some people rivet alot and can't hear any more. This is very easy and cheap. Use 1/2 inch water pipe and short lenghts of 3/8 inch goodyear hose for coupling , if you use plastic pipe it can dry out and explode. Get two roll up hose storage devices. One for oiled air and one for clean air (for the painting). Never mix your hoses between air tools and painting. 3/8 inch goodyear hoses supply enough air for all tools and painting. Never loan out your tools because they might not lubricate the air tools and get oil in your painting equipment. Put the cheap brass couplers on every thing. Use 3/8 hose all over with out regaurd to the couplers. So rather than spending a lot of money just do it smart. Now a question for you. You want to air up your car tires. Which hose do you use?
    Lee
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2008
  8. Sep 2, 2008 #8

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    near San Diego

    Hi Lee,

    Uh oh, is this a trick question? It is one of the reasons I want an air compressor at home. I'm always messing around with tire pressures trying to squeeze out another mile or so.
     
  9. Sep 3, 2008 #9

    expedition2166

    expedition2166

    expedition2166

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2007
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    bainbridge ga
    I remember i asked the same question bout oxy and acet hoses a long time ago and i learned why , we all were working on an old ATV we were trying to get the rear brake drum off of it so we grab the torch and noticed the ox was a little low so we grabbed another tank and decided we needed to change to a ''burner'' head instead of a cutting head we changed tanks and head turned the valve on the ox and the head and hoses burst into one hell of a fire later it dawned on us that the hose wasn't tight and had been sat in a puddle of penetrant after nearly burning the shop down and removing the fender remnants from our newly fender-less ATV we eventually got the drum off and from now on no absolutely NO greasy oily hands on the torch, hoses , or valves

    one Lil experiment you can try is a shop towel soaked in oil and open the valve ox on the torch head and set it there on the towel and watch the fireworks

    just don't do it where you'll burn the place down and take proper precautions
     
  10. Sep 12, 2008 #10
    Here is my reccommendation for anyone setting up an air compressor and hose for their project. When you purchase the cheap hose or even a name like Goodyear, if it has a crimped fitting at each end, it will eventually leak.
    It becomes very annoying and you cut it off and try to fix it with a hose clamp and push in fitting. It lasts a short while, then you cut it again. You must make trips to the hardware store and purchase the repair parts or a replacement hose.

    Instead spend the extra money to buy "Parker Hanninfan" 801-6 3/8 push lock hose. The fittings simply push into the end of the hose and seal. They almost never leak but if they should, then cut an inch off and reinsert the push in fitting again. The quality of the hose is such that it will probably last the rest of your life, and you never have to waste half a day getting repair parts. If you ever should damage the hose in the middle, a simple double ended push in fitting can be inserted.

    As for the fittings that you use, if you take the time to buy Milton #1839
    1/4 NPT 3/8 H Style you will flow much more air. These fitings have the same 1/4 NPT thread that common fittings have, but the hole thru them is over twice the size. There are other mfgs who make these but I don't know their part number. When you try to run an air tool, you won't have your airflow restriced like the common ones often do. Also if you try to spray paint with a high volume low pressure gun, you will have lots more airflow with the low pressure you are using.

    You have to buy the correct air chuck connectors to work with these as different mfgs use different shape fittings. So buy them all at the same time. Also, the higher quality chucks have more balls on the inside and last a lot longer. You can stick with the cheapos, but you'll be spending a lot of time going for replacement parts instead of working on your airplane.

    Last, suck it up and buy a decent compressor. Most of the little ones aren't worth having, and they are LOUD and ANNOYING. Almost everyone who buys one wishes they had a better one, so be smart the first time. This isn't the place to skimp...bite the bullet and get a good one.....two stage.

    The one thing I see happen over and over is builders convincing themselves that they can get by with the cheap stuff and then regreting it later...and
    often spending more money in the long run.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white