Jabiru 2200 or 582? Discuss, please

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Jul 24, 2021
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The benefit of your experience is requested. I have an Xair project with a 582 with oil injection, so I have two tanks, one oil, one neat gas/petrol. I have the opportunity to buy a very nice Xair, ready to go but with an early model (hydraulic tappets) Jabiru 4-stroke. There's little cost difference.
Which should I go for?
 

Rattler1 1

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First I'm not an expert on Jabiru. I like the 4 stroke and have considered this engine many times as it looks good and its 4 stroke. But when I asked basically the same question when buying my Titan Tornado, I got a lot of negative info on the Jabiru. I have owned several 582's in different airplanes and gyrocopters. They always ran. On my Tbird I had 600 hours on it without touching it. But you need the right oil and in my opinion get rid of the oil injection and mix your oil in the gas. Only use Amsoil Intersepter. That said, I still keep looking at 4 cycles for some reason.
 

TFF

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From what I have read, the early Jabiru engine is trouble. If it has the updates, it’s probably fine. If not, the Rotax might be the better choice. Which one can you afford if they break?
 
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Thank you all. One of the benefits of a 4-stroke is that you don't have to fool around with fuel, you just add some and go. A 2-stroke mix will go off in a certain amount of time, whatever that may be. If you're leaving your aircraft for a month then you have to drain the tank, leaving you with an expensive can of useless but volatile liquid, something that having oil injection obviates. However, Rattler1 advises against this system - does anyone have experience of it?
 

TFF

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Like anything man made, it can fail. Lots don’t like the separate oiler for the times it might fail. You get glider practice right away. These things are in your budget for a reason, they have quirks that more money can solve. Both these engines require diligence. No slacking in operation or missing signs of needing maintenance. They are not no muss no fuss put away wet until next time. Both have ways that are not negotiable and both might surprise you anyway. That said you can have a lot of fun.
 

Jim Chuk

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I've been flying a Jabiru 2200 in my Avid flyer for over 500 hrs. For performance, in take off and climb, it's about the same as the 582 it replaced and is better in cruise by about 10 mph. Mine is the solid lifter engine and those engines were considered to be better then the hydraulic lifter engines that came next. Biggest concern in my opinion is cooling with the Jabirus. In the open air engine style Xair, that may not be as much of an issue. Rotec (not Rotax) in Australia makes liquid cooled heads for the Jabirus and that seems to be a good way to go if cooling is a concern. Not real cheap though as you can imagine. JImChuk
 

Rattler1 1

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I have removed the oil injection on 3 of my aircraft. In my opinion its a cheap system and no positive way to meter the oil to each cylinder. I know of two instances where one side got oil and the other didn't. This takes out the crank bearing. Rotax Rick also recommends removal. Mixing the oil in the gas eliminates any issues with oil injection.
 

ToddK

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Injection is a hard topic. If you are going to follow the service schedual and do a full tear down in 300hrs or 5 years, and plan on inspecting the injection and replacing it as necessary then you might be ok. The trouble is that these engines often run well beyond that 300hr mark. I personally know guys who have put over 1000hrs on the engines with zero trouble (not to be confused with zero maintenance). They all run premix.
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2021
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Again, thank you all. I've made an enquiry for the Jabiru-engined machine. It may cost me some engine work but the fabric's good and it'll come with a new CAA Permit to Fly for about $8,400.
I have this from a UK Jabiru engineer, which I hope someone finds useful. "Firstly start the engine from cold (must be cold) and run at 1200 revs for exactly 2 mins, pull back to tickover and shut down while watching the propeller, it should bounce slightly as it stops, if it stops dead the engine is tight." I assure you all, this will be done before I part with any money.
 

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