Your thoughts on those temporary aircraft tie downs.....

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Nickathome

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The yearly airshow at our airport is this weekend (Aug 25-26), and that means aircraft(mine included) that are parked on the tarmac, must be moved. The paved tarmac area is where the viewing public is allowed. I will be parking down the hill in a flat grassy/dirt area that's off limits to the public(saw people let their children climb on airplanes in the other field, hence why I park where I do). Anyway, I am going to use "The Claw" that I bought several years ago, for the first time. I bought these tiedowns for the off chance I fly to a grass strip and there are no tiedowns. So far I have never had to use them. Just wondering what your thoughts are on these and other types of temporary tiedowns. I've read good and bad about just about all of them, with most testimonials mentioning the tornado at Sun n Fun last year, and using that as the gauge for the success or failure of any tiedowns. I don't expect to have to withstand a tornado, but am curious to hear what you all think.
 

skeeter_ca

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At oshkosh this year i saw many different types of tie-downs. The ones that seem to hold the best had 3 yellow legs go outward about 12" from the center and had stakes driven in the ground pointing inward. Is that the one you have?

skeeter
 

autoreply

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We used steel cables, connected to very deeply buried concrete-filled oil drums. Impractical for a temporary one obviously.
 
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Nickathome

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At oshkosh this year i saw many different types of tie-downs. The ones that seem to hold the best had 3 yellow legs go outward about 12" from the center and had stakes driven in the ground pointing inward. Is that the one you have?

skeeter

Yep, that's what I have...You'll see a youtube video(not the video in Autoreply's post above) that mentions them not holding anywhere near what they're rated at, and they break the leg off in the test. However that test was flawed. The man pulled on an angle. The instructions that come with the Claw clearly mention placing them directly under the tiedown loop for a vertical hookup....

BTW - they also sell them piecemeal and are marketed that way as pet anchors.
 

Dave Prizio

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Of the different types I have seen used The Claw seems to work the best in the most different types of ground. For example, the screw-type anchors work well in he grass at Oshkosh but are pretty much worthless in hard, rocky ground. The Claw is on the heavy side, but they work just about anywhere. And when the wind blows hard they hold.
 

Matt G.

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Of the different types I have seen used The Claw seems to work the best in the most different types of ground. For example, the screw-type anchors work well in he grass at Oshkosh but are pretty much worthless in hard, rocky ground. The Claw is on the heavy side, but they work just about anywhere. And when the wind blows hard they hold.

The claw anchors also seemed inferior during the Sun'n'Fun tornado last year...I heard most of the aircraft that were tossed from their tiedowns used that type. So they may not be good in sandy soil, either.
 

bmcj

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I just tie mine down to a C-5 Galaxy or something of similar size or weight! :gig:

Actually, if it's going to be windy (monsoonal), you can park a car on each side and tie down to the cars.

I used to fly a J3 Cub up to El Mirage Dry Lake for play and airshow/fly-ins. The winds up there get pretty strong later in the day and there was nothing to tie down to, so I would lock the brakes, chock the wheels and strap the control stick straight forward. If the wind picked up enough, the tail would lift (high up) and the negative AOA would cause the wings to push down even harder on the wheels. It did a pretty good job of sticking it in place, but I still took the steady state tail in the air as a sign that it was time to go.
 

wsimpso1

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I don't see anybody leading the line off at an angle. I have been using the simple stake kind that drive in perpendicular to the angle the rope leads off to the airplane at. I would like to see how the laods they can handle.
 

autoreply

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Actually, if it's going to be windy (monsoonal), you can park a car on each side and tie down to the cars.
We used to do the same thing with trailers. One wing under them (sailplanes), old tire on top and tie-down to the next trailer. Worked well in 50 kts gusts.

That got me thinking. Why not use those bags they use to transport stones? About 50 cubic feet or so, so if you put one under each wing and fill them up, that's certainly plenty to keep it down in any storm?

Putting "folded" tape over your whole leading edge (seriously) also helps a lot, you destroy most of the lift and you need almost twice the wind speeds to get the aircraft moving..
 

Nickathome

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The claw anchors also seemed inferior during the Sun'n'Fun tornado last year...I heard most of the aircraft that were tossed from their tiedowns used that type. So they may not be good in sandy soil, either.

Earlier today I read a man's account of the Sun N Fun incidents, and he made a good point. He said from his observations of planes that were tossed about or pulled loose from their tiedowns that, "none of the various temporary tiedowns held 100% of the time, but none failed 100% of the time either"......
 

Dana

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I've used the steel earth anchors I got from a contractor supply. It's a steel rod about 2' long with an eye on one end and a disk, about 3" diameter on the other. The disk is split and twisted so it screws itself into the ground. A bit bulky and heavy for traveling tiedowns, but strong enough for permanent use.

-Dana

Everybody who lives, dies, but not everybody who dies, has lived.
 

Nickathome

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I've used the steel earth anchors I got from a contractor supply. It's a steel rod about 2' long with an eye on one end and a disk, about 3" diameter on the other. The disk is split and twisted so it screws itself into the ground. A bit bulky and heavy for traveling tiedowns, but strong enough for permanent use.

-Dana

Everybody who lives, dies, but not everybody who dies, has lived.

They sell those at Tractor Supply. You can buy various lengths as well. Look like they'd be incredibly strong but yes definitely for a permanent setup and not for traveling....
 

bmcj

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Putting "folded" tape over your whole leading edge (seriously) also helps a lot, you destroy most of the lift and you need almost twice the wind speeds to get the aircraft moving..
I'd like to second this suggestion. Lift interruption can be simple and efficient, and it can reduce the load experienced by any of the temporary anchors.
 
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