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WW1 Rigging wire

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Joined
Apr 24, 2020
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13
I had a friend ask me a question - and I'm stumped!
I'm sure somone on here will know....

Planes from WW1 are described as having wire with a spec of 18/10 and 25/10.
I assume these are perhaps threads and diameter but no idea and couldn't find anything on Google about them either...

Any body know more about them?
Thanks
 

Wanttaja

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Sep 15, 2013
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Location
Seattle, WA
I had a friend ask me a question - and I'm stumped!
I'm sure somone on here will know....

Planes from WW1 are described as having wire with a spec of 18/10 and 25/10.
I assume these are perhaps threads and diameter but no idea and couldn't find anything on Google about them either...

Any body know more about them?
Thanks
I'd guess the first number is the wire gauge, and the second number is the number of strands of the wire used. "10" is an awkward number, for that.

Here's a chart of piano wire sizes, which has entries corresponding to the "18" and "25"


Ron Wanttaja
 
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
13
Thank you Ron....
Will pass it on and see if it makes any sense....
Should have mentioned in my original post - this is in reltion to a SPAD XIII
Thanks again :)
 

ktfiles

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Feb 26, 2012
Messages
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Location
USA
Planes from WW1 are described as having wire with a spec of 18/10 and 25/10.
I assume these are perhaps threads and diameter but no idea and couldn't find anything on Google about them either...
This nomenclature for wire sizes was used by the French only as far as I know during WWI. Wire sizes used for the hard drawn bracing wire used in the SPAD XIII fuselage included 25/10, 20/10 and 18/10. Thus 25/10 = 2.5 mm, 20/10 = 2 mm and 18/10 = 1.8 mm.




 
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
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ktfiles - you're a legend... that is just what I was after!
Thank you very much....it is much appreciated...

How did you come across this information if I may ask?

Great to know thanks..
Craig
 

ktfiles

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Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
128
Location
USA
How did you come across this information if I may ask?
Along with having a large library of information regarding pre-1930 British, French and German aircraft, I also network with several knowledgeable individuals that also have access to libraries and museums around the world. What I don't know or can figure out myself, can usually be found within a few days.
 

SuperSpinach

Active Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
33
Location
France
Hello,

As a French machinist, this is a very common way to describe thickness in millimetres here in France. Rather than writing 2.5mm or 0.1mm, etc we use fractions.
I mostly see it used with sheet metal work but it is sometimes used in machining to describe depth of cut.
 
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