Wrong impression of the EAA?

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Kyle Boatright

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Nov 11, 2012
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Marietta, GA
I had high hopes with Jack Pelton in a leadership role since Jack grew up with EAA Chapter One the same time I did, but I hear now that he may be stepping down from EAA. Very disheartening if he does leave.

Jack's initial column in the magazine pretty much indicated that it is a temporary role for him. He didn't say as much, but I assumed that depending on how it goes, maybe it could turn into something long term. Is there recent news that he's looking to get out or that the board has found their long term guy/gal?
 

Inverted Vantage

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Jun 19, 2008
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The EAA chapter I was most familiar with, #44, did indeed specialize in Young Eagles and fund raising...but then they also built a "Sport Aviation Center" on the airport and use it to host meetings, talks, workshops, etc. There was also at least one designer/builder there who was working on his own amphibian flying wing.

I think the shift is down to several reasons, namely;

- growing cost of flying and lessening of disposable income to spend on it.

- steady shift away from people having the skill to build things themselves.

- lack of new blood in aviation, putting more focus on programs that try to get kids in early.

Personally, I don't really mind the way the EAA is structured now, but I wish they would focus less on the 9-14 year old crowd and instead start looking at getting young adults in. It's difficult to get into aviation when you're the only one at the meeting who's old enough to drive and young enough to still have their first or second license! XD

Plus, young adults are going to be the movers and shakers in the next few years, same as they have always been, whereas getting kids who are 9-14 involved is an investment that may only pay off many years down the line. Plus, young adults are old enough to handle tools; so getting more of them involved might mean more actual design and building.
 

wsimpso1

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Oct 18, 2003
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Saline Michigan
I have been involved with two chapters. One has a bunch of folks, is good at fund raising, has a few pilots and airplanes, and is mostly into hanging out at the airport, and sometimes flying a few Young Eagles. The other had a lot less people, but they were almost all pilots, most have airplanes, they fly Young Eagles every year, and they are into building airplanes with me. Guess whch one I am involved with.

Billski
 

SVSUSteve

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Aug 20, 2007
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3,904
Location
Evansville, Indiana
This forum has mostly replaced EAA, for me.

This forum has largely replaced the EAA Forums for me. I only go over there to watch people freak out and whine about how they aren't getting exactly what they want to the exclusion of the other members of the EAA at AirVenture, in Sport Aviation, etc. It's kind of like wandering into a psych ward to listen to crazy people babble just so you don't feel so bad about yourself. LOL
 

Dave Prizio

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Dec 29, 2010
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Location
Tustin, CA / USA
The EAA is many things to many different types of people in aviation. It needs to be broad-based to survive and thrive.

You should not judge the EAA by your experience with one chapter. Individual chapters vary a lot. Some are very builder-oriented some are not. For example in SoCal the San Diego chapter has a strong builder orientation, as does the Compton chapter. On the other hand the Orange County chapter has a smaller builder presence and focuses more on social and Young Eagle programs. Chapter 1 in the Riverside area (Flabob Airport) has an active YE program but also manages to keep its builder roots strong. In each chapter it depends on leadership and membership to form the character of the chapter.

Overall the EAA grapples with the same issues. There are many different aviators who all deserve a place at the table: homebuilts, war birds, vintage, ultralights and LSA, certificated, and so on. EAA includes them all because together we are much stronger than we are apart. And further, many of us have more than one aviation interest.

I suggest you get involved in your local chapter and try to push them in the direction of your interests. If they won't budge start your own chapter. You don't need an attorney. Just call EAA. They will help you set it up. The EAA needs you and you need them, too.

Dave Prizio
EAA Homebuilt Aircraft Council
 

bmcj

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Apr 10, 2007
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Location
Fresno, California
I suggest you get involved in your local chapter and try to push them in the direction of your interests. If they won't budge start your own chapter.

I concur. Pushing a chapter in a new direction might be easier than you suspect. Many chapters have settled into a routine, waiting for others to set the agenda or book the entertainment. They may welcome new blood and new ideas.
 

Jim Chuk

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Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Messages
164
Location
Chisholm Mn USA
I guess it all depends on the chapter and it's members. Close to me there are two chapters. Hibbing, and Grand Rapids, 35 miles apart. Hibbing seems to be the almost no building, fundraiser type of chapter. Grand Rapids had their meetings at different people's hangars or garages where an airplane was being built. Unfortunatly I live way closer to Hibbing, so I'm not a member in either one. Take care, Jim Chuk
 
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