Would others be interested in a CNC machine for $2k-$4k? laser/plasma cutter options

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by CobraCar11, Mar 2, 2016.

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  1. Mar 4, 2016 #21

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    Re: Would others be interested in a CNC machine for $2k-$4k? laser/plasma cutter opti

    You had me at "new toy". :gig:
     
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  2. Mar 7, 2016 #22

    WK95

    WK95

    WK95

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    Re: Would others be interested in a CNC machine for $2k-$4k? laser/plasma cutter opti

    speaking strictly for myself, I don't need the sort of tolerances for composite work compared to sheet metal or wood work. Mostly, I'd like a 5-axis CNC to make molds and forms. In most cases, it seems 1/100 of an inch might be fine enough. Lots of flox, micro, and sandpaper where needed might help out with making things fit.
     
  3. Mar 7, 2016 #23

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    Re: Would others be interested in a CNC machine for $2k-$4k? laser/plasma cutter opti

    ...on the "belt drive vs. lead screw" subject: my machine uses a very short cog belt to a rack and pinion gear for X and Y and a jack screw on the Z. Any backlash error in the machine is far below how much the machine (any machine) will change from a cold morning to a hot afternoon.

    People are okay with using a Harbor Freight tape measure to draw a line with a .07" pencil that they cut with a wobbly band saw but they freak out if they think a CNC machine has .001 backlash :gig:

    Put it in perspective: Just about any reasonable machine you build will hold it's accuracy to within a few thousandths after an hour long cut job ...then, when it's all done, plow your $60 bit through the middle of $200 worth of finished material because you screwed up the G Code (...been there :cry: )

    I just cut the seat pan for a Waiex project tonight (modified to single stick). Any machine error is "in the noise" compared to the errors that would add up if I'd used a Harbor Freight tape measure, Sharpie marker, tin snips and a file. And it was a shiiiiiiiiiit load easier and faster.
    WaiexX seat Pan 2.jpg

    I also made a butt load of phenolic canopy latch plates for the gang on the Sonex builders group. Any error wasn't measurable with my dial caliper.
    Canopy Latch CNC.jpg
     
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