Workshop Overhead Chainfall?

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Alan_VA

Active Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2011
Messages
32
Location
Bristow, VA
I have reached the age and physical condition where lifting heavy/awkward things has become a bit "iffy", so I'm thinking of installing a traversing chainfall in the overhead of my workshop. The shop is 11' x 24' with the usual roof trusswork overhead. Or am I over-thinking the problem? Simpler answers, especially those not requiring design work, are always welcome.
 

Derswede

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Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
920
Location
Central North Carolina
Put one in my old workshop. Found a hoist for dye bags in a textile plant, got it and the I-beam for removal costs. The hoist was on a wheeled trolly which could be pulled back and forth along the rail. Lifted quite a few engines with it. It was designed to hold a wet sling with several hundred pounds of dyed goods. IIRC, it was rated at 2400 lbs. As it went cross joist, I attached at each joist a plate that supported the ibeam. A bit of work, but I could pull an engine out and swing it to the worktable. I now have a fixed 600 kg electric winch in my warehouse. I have lots of roller plates to move heavy items.

An easier and cheaper means may be an engine hoist. I have a Harbor Fright hoist, about $150, works well, 2 ton hoist, rolls well. Pulled the engine out of my Volvo with no problem. It folds up and can be stored in a fairly small space. Major limit for me is height. Can't put things on pallet racking with it, have to use the forklift to get it high enough. Cheap and very usable in a workshop.
 

dog

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Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
294
I scratch built thisIMG_20200316_161603_NR.jpgSo that I could move this IMG_20200316_161511_NR.jpgout and move thisIMG_20200316_161624_NR.jpgin
had to go back out to get pics.
New sofware is working ok on mobile
 

cvairwerks

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
208
Location
North Texas
Most trusses are not designed to handle the additional load. The other thing that you need to look at is required headroom for a hoist. A typical 1/2 ton hoist needs about a foot of headroom. Now add a trolley and you have a need for about 18-24" under the beam. For typical construction, that will place the body of the hoist just about in your face.....
A better solution for most, would be either an engine hoist that will fold up, or a mobile gantry that has vertical adjustment.
 

cluttonfred

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HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
7,284
Location
World traveler
+1 on the portable engine hoist if you have a smooth hard floor. The cheapest Harbor Freight one costs $190, folds up when not in use, and is rated for 1 ton. Northern Tool offers something similar.


 

dog

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
294
-1 two ton floor hoistIMG_20200316_185554_NR.jpg
I cut it up for the steel to build a work table, top is leaned up behind.
My trolley crane has 80" under it with the hoist wrapped around the I beam.
 
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