Winter depression anyone?

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Mac790, Feb 6, 2010.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Feb 6, 2010 #1

    Mac790

    Mac790

    Mac790

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,529
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Poznan, Poland
    I don't know like you guys, but I have an allergy on white color, unfortunately almost my entire country is covered by snow at the moment (actually for the last 40 days, second year in row:dis:). Check out those pics, it's looks like a North Pole, seems that guys from global warming, fight successively.

    I can't wait to see green color and sunshine again, fortunately we have youtube with nice movies check out those two, that's what I call flying, life starts at 200mph+ :gig:




    Seb
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 20, 2019
  2. Feb 7, 2010 #2

    pie_row

    pie_row

    pie_row

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    salt lake city Ut
    You changed what you wrote and what you quoted of me after the fact. And so this statement of yours is a lie. And in doing this you abused you moderator privileges.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2011
  3. Feb 7, 2010 #3

    mz-

    mz-

    mz-

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Finland
    Here are global lower troposphere satellite temps for January 2010.
    [​IMG]
    Cold in USA, Europe and Siberia, warm elsewhere.
     
  4. Feb 8, 2010 #4

    pie_row

    pie_row

    pie_row

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    salt lake city Ut
    You changed what you wrote and what you quoted of me after the fact. And so this statement of yours is a lie. And in doing this you abused you moderator privileges.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2011
  5. Feb 9, 2010 #5

    vortilon

    vortilon

    vortilon

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Messages:
    453
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Marana AZ USA
    Typical Arizona day here 70F and severe clear. Shoveling sunshine.
     
  6. Feb 9, 2010 #6

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12,960
    Likes Received:
    4,896
    Location:
    Fresno, California
    I hate you! :gig:
     
  7. Feb 9, 2010 #7

    Joe Kidd

    Joe Kidd

    Joe Kidd

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Old Sol has heated up and cooled down a few times over the eon's, that degree or lack of solar radiation has a significant impact on climate. Winter blue's aren't any fun at all, we've had more than a bit of snow this year and snow cover, coupled with an over cast sky are gloomy. Bring on the bright sunshine and roll in springtime...
     
  8. Feb 9, 2010 #8

    Alan Waters

    Alan Waters

    Alan Waters

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2009
    Messages:
    530
    Likes Received:
    79
    Location:
    Conover N.C.
    I understand they are having a little trouble getting snow for the winter olympics in Canada.
     
  9. Feb 9, 2010 #9

    Orwasi

    Orwasi

    Orwasi

    Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Interesting piccy, but I'm having trouble figuring out why Canada in winter shows up as much hotter than Australia in summer...
     
  10. Feb 9, 2010 #10

    litespeed

    litespeed

    litespeed

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,492
    Likes Received:
    296
    Location:
    Sydney
    I was wondering that as well?

    All the data we seem to get down here in Australia says things are changing and much faster in some areas and slower in others. Living in a country that is the driest and hottest continent on the planet - we tend to notice pretty quickly.

    I would love some of your snow. As our average temp here rises the fire season gets more intense and firestorms become more regular and much more deadly- last year over 200 died and a million acres destroyed including whole towns in one of our cooler southern states- Victoria. The firefront at one stage moved at up to 250kph.

    Unless this trend changes, the last thing I would expect is another ice age.

    sweating it out
    Litespeed
     
  11. Feb 9, 2010 #11

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12,960
    Likes Received:
    4,896
    Location:
    Fresno, California
    We need to define exactly what they are mapping in that graphic chart. The scale says "Brightness Temperature Anomoly", but what does that mean? Is it a measure of the CHANGE or reflectivity from the Earth and clouds? Depending on the true definition, we may be reading the chart opposite of its true interpretation.

    That is the pitfall of debates such as this... people can throw out graphics to justify their point of view, but until you really know what it is saying, you don't know which side of the argument, if either, it actually validates.

    Bruce :)
     
  12. Feb 9, 2010 #12

    pie_row

    pie_row

    pie_row

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    salt lake city Ut
    You changed what you wrote and what you quoted of me after the fact. And so this statement of yours is a lie. And in doing this you abused you moderator privileges.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2011
  13. Feb 10, 2010 #13

    Dana

    Dana

    Dana

    Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    8,662
    Likes Received:
    3,048
    Location:
    CT, USA
    But how do you define "average"? AGW believers talk about the rise in the Earth's "average" temperature, but in an scientific measurement it's necessary to have accurately calibrated instruments. Where were those calibrated instruments 100 years ago?

    There seems little doubt that the planet has been warming for the last few hundred years, overlaid on a sinusoidal temperature variation that spans some decades. There's quite a bit of doubt whether human activity has much, if anything, to do with it.

    There's also little doubt that when they happen, ice ages happen fast. A few degrees warmer and plants grow better and crop belts move north. In an ice age, billions would perish. The place to put money today is research so we can learn what's really happening, not band aid fixes based on dubious "data" that do little more than enrich Al Gore while impoverishing the rest of us.

    -Dana

    Sometimes it is easier to beg forgiveness than get permission.
     
  14. Feb 10, 2010 #14

    litespeed

    litespeed

    litespeed

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,492
    Likes Received:
    296
    Location:
    Sydney
    Yes depending on who you talk to they can read anything to suit their argument.

    The soot/ice effect is the Albedo effect and is a significant problem which tends to runaway in the melt direction. Yes we find that some parts of the planet are actually getting colder and even some glaciers are growing, but that ignores that almost all glaciers are shrinking at alarming rates. The planet is a very complex thing and not simple to study, and many aspects are still unknown to science. And yes modern measurements are a lot more accurate but we can actually tell what the temp and atmosphere was like millions of years ago with ice core samples and even trees for recent times.

    Yes soot levels have dropped for older industrial countries but Co2 levels are still rising, due to rapid economic development in the new economies and the runaway consumption in the west. Other gasses such as Methane have a far greater effect- never in history has the planet had so many ruminant animals such as cattle that belch and fart Methane. Add in the huge amount of forest we have destroyed and we get a serious problem- forests take up CO2 and give O2, this stores carbon and eventually locks it away from the atmosphere as fossil carbon deep in the ground. WE humans have burnt a lot of this stored carbon, some say at least 100 Million years worth of fossil carbon in less than 200 years. That can not be a good thing. Like most things- nature eventually finds a balance and a new equilibrium, but will that allow us to live like today? I doubt it.

    When we talk about a small rise in average temp for the globe we must remember that this means the ocean rise a smaller amount and land masses a greater amount, and some spots by a very big amount. Yes a increase in Co2 and warmer weather is good for plants in general but also bad for all other life, the rate of change can be too great for many species to adapt so they become extinct. Increases in CO2 changes the acidity of the oceans and reduces O2 levels aquatic life needs for survival. Here in Australia our Barrier Reef- worlds biggest, is shrinking fast by bleaching from heat and acidity dissolving the coral. Meanwhile up North, the Northwest Passage is becoming open to shipping as the Arctic melts, Polar bears starve to death etc.

    The biggest thing besides a warming affect to worry about is the gyrations of climate and weather patterns whilst the earth slowly settles to a new equilibrium- think lots more extreme weather events, in places that never had them in recent history, such storms, heat waves etc will kill and disrupt millions. Some now fertile areas that feed millions will become unsustainable.

    America has spent many billions on wars about fuel security, maybe spending a similar amount to reduce the need for imported energy is a lot smarter even if it just creates Jobs and reduces your trade deificit- you know- that thing that has cost Trillions to prop up dodgy banks.

    Just a thought
     
  15. Feb 10, 2010 #15

    pie_row

    pie_row

    pie_row

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    salt lake city Ut
    You changed what you wrote and what you quoted of me after the fact. And so this statement of yours is a lie. And in doing this you abused you moderator privileges.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2011
  16. Feb 10, 2010 #16

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12,960
    Likes Received:
    4,896
    Location:
    Fresno, California
    I don't think that anyone disagrees that mankind can have an effect on the environment. The question is, "to what degree?" I think that there are a great many natural events (i.e. - solar cycles, volcanic eruptions, the rare but not unheard of asteroid/cometary impact) that can dwarf any effect that man can have on global temperature.

    Should man be conscientious in his effect on the environment... sure! No one wants to see our planet trashed. I think that most people will take reasonable measures to reduce their negative impact on the environment.

    Should environmental behavior be mandated, especially above all other concerns... that's the rub!

    Bruce :)
     
  17. Feb 10, 2010 #17

    autoreply

    autoreply

    autoreply

    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    10,732
    Likes Received:
    2,542
    Location:
    Rotterdam, Netherlands
    Hey, finally a climate debate where people are critical :)

    I didn't hear it here yet, but since 1998 we're cooling again, so no worries.

    Just an hour ago the headlines here where "interesting":

    Out of the 110 contributors to the Dutch contribution of the IPCC report 109 were strong supporters of the man-caused global warming. About half of that group is from activist groups like Greenpeace and even more agressive ones...

    Fortunately enough our minister of environmental affairs is a former chairman of the Dutch equivalent of Greenpeace and according to her the report is still "valid" and "correct except for small mistakes".
     
  18. Feb 10, 2010 #18

    mz-

    mz-

    mz-

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Finland
    I've followed the field quite a lot and also know some climate modelers who are good and honest people. Most of the reasons to be "skeptical" of climate chance are really badly founded if you examine them a bit more closely.

    Many popular reasons are covered here:
    Arguments from Global Warming Skeptics and what the science really says

    The very first one is the solar hypothesis.

     
  19. Feb 10, 2010 #19

    pie_row

    pie_row

    pie_row

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    salt lake city Ut
    You changed what you wrote and what you quoted of me after the fact. And so this statement of yours is a lie. And in doing this you abused you moderator privileges.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2011
  20. Feb 10, 2010 #20

    Rom

    Rom

    Rom

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Messages:
    489
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Medina, Ohio
    In spite of pro vs con in the climate debate, with 10,000,000,000 tons and ever increasing amounts of carbon being moved every year from fossil deposits to the atmosphere, I feel like lab rat in a global experiment that has been running for the past 100 years. Lets keep increasing the atmospheric carbon and see what happens.
    Half of the carbon is naturally sequestered in the oceans but what is the saturation point?
    Hopefully biofuels, solar, wind and other non fossil energy will balance the equation.
     

Share This Page



arrow_white