Why the animosity towards ultralights?

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xwing

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Amazing to me what kids have these days, what they have access to, stuff they can do & where they go..
 

MadProfessor8138

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In my best announcer voice.......

WEDNESDAY,WEDNESDAY, WEDNESDAY........IT'S THE FAA & MMA WEDNESDAY NIGHT FLIGHT & FIGHT NIGHT.........

In this corner flying the Cessna 150 and wearing the dark colored knee board is WRONG WAY LINDEY......
In the other corner flying the Quicksilver MXL and sporting some nifty mirror sunglasses is STEVE,THE PATTERN CUTTER........

PROGRAAAAAMS....GETCHAA PROGRAMS....CAN'T TELL THE FLYERS FROM THE FIGHTERS WITHOUT ONE....PROGRAMS.....


Sorry......the post Pops made tickled me for some reason....

Kevin
 

BBerson

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We had a tiedown ultralight get flipped onto a C-180 in a windstorm. The C-180 owner came out and burned the ultralight.
 

radfordc

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There tends to be a lot of ridicule towards ultralights in my location that comes from GA pilots mostly.
It ranges from the snide comments of "ultra-fright" or "flying lawn chair" all the way to banning them from the airports entirely.
My description of an ultralight to people who aren't familiar with them is "it's a lawn chair with wings". They understand immediately what I'm talking about. What else would you call a Quicksilver MX?
 

Chris In Marshfield

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I haven't been flying as long as many in this group, but I have a PPL and got a couple of add-ons. I started with the usual suspects: C152, C172, Archer, and I bought my own plane a few years back. I've been building another over the past year or many, and the truth of the matter is I'm just "plane" bored of it all. I discovered my local ultralight chapter, and now I'm excited about flying again. They're having a great time, and I'm looking forward to a new adventure.
 

BBerson

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plane" bored of it all. I discovered my local ultralight chapter, and now I'm excited about flying again. They're having a great time, and I'm looking forward to a new adventure.
Lucky you have an ultralight chapter. Only 19 left and none in Washingtom.
I hope the local EAA chapter stays ultralight friendly. I think EAA should somehow incorporate the ultralights in regular chapters. I am considering applying as an Ultralight Tech Counselor. (my idea, none exist yet)
 

flyrite

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I think it's the snobbery of those with some sort of a certification or degree.
"You are not a true pilot without a government private pilot certificate" (or ATP)
" You can't design an airplane without an engineering degree"
" You can't build a house if not a contractor"
" You can't inspect an airplane without a mechanic certificate" and on and on...

BINGO...BINGO....BINGO....Give this man a cigar for he has NAILED IT!
 

Chris In Marshfield

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Lucky you have an ultralight chapter. Only 19 left and none in Washingtom.
I hope the local EAA chapter stays ultralight friendly. I think EAA should somehow incorporate the ultralights in regular chapters. I am considering applying as an Ultralight Tech Counselor. (my idea, none exist yet)
I consider myself very lucky. We actually have two UL chapters in Wisconsin: UL1, the one I’m in, and UL75 in northern Wisconsin. Super lucky.
 

PW_Plack

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For many GA pilots, the idea that people have decided to fly aerial vehicles with no legally-required training, with no airworthiness standards or required inspection, with no radios, at speeds far below normal traffic, sounds understandably scary. It's made worse when UL pilots don't know the procedures and vocabulary of aviation, which they'd have learned if they'd been in flight schools.

I don't know what an "ultralight instructor" even is anymore, since the FAA put them all out of business.

I fly gyroplanes, and have faced the same issues even though I'm N-numbered. One of the most satisfying things I've done in aviation was to learn to smoothly integrate my flying into heavy skydive and glider operations at an airport where I was hangared, to the point that they no longer saw me as a threat.

Most small airports see only an upside in increased operations, because it can help with funding. But I'm not sure ultralights (in the US) even are counted.
 

Pops

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I live on a grass field airport and the most question I get is " Who gives you the permission to takeoff and land". My standard answer is " the same person that gives you permission to take your car out and in your driveway". I always get a strange look. Freedom is strange to a lot of people.
 

samyguy

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FLYRITE is right there is no money in ultralights for the good old boys, so as things are done
some of their buddy's with power, wrote the LSA rules and ran Ultralights off into the sunset they hope.
It was the only part of aviation that was growing for the common man and healthy. And the EAA and AOPO let us down.
Of course we weren't helping our selfs, flying 2 place trainers when we shouldn't have been.
We could have used a little oversite from the FAA, I know no one want's the aircops around, but it may have saved us
 

Pops

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Used to be a large ultralight club at a grass field about 50 miles south of me. Over a hundred members. I used to fly down on the weekends and spend the day with all the flyers and enjoy the fun. Long gone now. Even the grass field is closed down now. 4K long runway with about 40 hangers, club house, kitchen and bathrooms for the ultralight campers for the weekends. Great bunch of people.
Owner of the field was a pilot and after he died the family stopped everything. He had it for sale at one time and I was going to buy it but he backed out and said the sons promised to keep it an airport. Closed shortly after he died.
 

Dan Thomas

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FLYRITE is right there is no money in ultralights for the good old boys, so as things are done
some of their buddy's with power, wrote the LSA rules and ran Ultralights off into the sunset they hope.
It was the only part of aviation that was growing for the common man and healthy. And the EAA and AOPO let us down.
Of course we weren't helping our selfs, flying 2 place trainers when we shouldn't have been.
We could have used a little oversite from the FAA, I know no one want's the aircops around, but it may have saved us
In Canada things are much different than the US. There are two categories of ultralights, the Basic Ultralight Aircraft and the Advanced Ultralight Aircraft. There are differences in weights and in training requirments, and in building and maintenance. A Basic (BULA) can't carry more than one person except for instruction. The Advanced (AULA) has much more restriction in building and maintenance and in the pilot's level of certification. Both types must be registered, and the AULA also gets a C of A. https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/standards/general-recavi-ultralight-ultransitionstrategy-privileges-2515.htm#pilot

This all came about as a result of so many accidents. That makes it no different than almost all the other regulations, which were written in someone's blood. Mankind tends to learn things the hard way.
 
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