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Why not a Continental IO-360?

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Twodeaddogs

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Jan 18, 2009
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988
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Dunlavin, County Wicklow,Ireland
I have been told the non-counter-weighted crankshafts are better as regards prop strikes. Some models of the IO-360 have counter weights and some do not. I bought my Mooney after a prop strike, did the AD and got about 300 hr before I noticed a crack in the "old style case" ....as to weather this was because of the prop strike or not I do not know. I do remember it was not much different than the O-320 inside, the rods had squirt fittings to squirt oil to the opposite cylinder, that the O-320 did not have. The press-fit through bolts were a pain as regard splitting the case in the IO-360 (I jacked them in and out with nuts and a stackup of washers) ....I do not remember that problem with the 67 Cherokee engine. I liked the stretch rod bolts for very accurate torque (measure with a mikecrometer ) on the IO-360. I was lucky as the local flight school let me trade them different size push rods to get the dry-lash right in the middle of the tolerance. Careful of the nut and bolt inside the top of the case when splitting the case.
I inspected an IO-540 that had a prop strike at full power when the undercarriage collapsed on the take-off roll. The blades were bent back like bananas, the prop internals were all smashed and the six mounting bolts were warped and the flange was off-centre. When we got the crank out, the counterweights had damaged the webs to which they were attached. One conrod was slightly bent and slightly twisted. Gear teeth were damaged in the accessory case. The crankcase was damaged but was sent to Lycoming and they repaired it and it flew again.
 

TFF

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Apr 28, 2010
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13,601
Location
Memphis, TN
During a prop strike, there is always a cylinder that is on the compression stroke. There is the unexpected external resistance mixed with the compression ignition. My personal engine I think was #2 cylinder. You could see it on the rod bearing. Luckily my engine was at idle and in dirt and I think a initial nibble in the ground slowed it down less abruptly. It has the original prop after being checked by a prop shop.

There was some rare Lycoming on barnstormers with the crank flange totaled and it went for a lot of money just because of the designation. Everything was probably thrown away when turned into Lycoming for a core, but on a certified plane that has to have that designation, it was gold.

Work has a nice Lycoming angle valve core, but it’s a helicopter engine. This version would be front governor but those passages are not machined. This version also used no thrust bearing forward main bearing. I have never spilt one so I don’t know if they skipped that machining step to be able to put a regular bearing in there. Essentially it’s the same engine as a 201 Mooney but missing stuff. There is some odd stuff out there.
 

Tommy222

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Joined
Mar 23, 2019
Messages
11
Again my 2C, this is getting mixed up between flying behind the engine and minor maintenance and repairing and overhauling . The six cyl. Is smoother running but overhauling is a different animal. By this I mean internal parts not just gaskets and hoses. Call some parts houses and price out the parts.
 

bmcj

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Apr 10, 2007
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13,513
Location
Fresno, California
I saw a Conti 90hp that had a ground strike. It was at idle, and the ‘contact’ was gradual, so the blades had multiple strikes that slowed it down gradually as it put a nice spiral roll in each of the blade tips (metal prop). The engine was checked out afterward and found to be undamaged.
 

Pops

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Jan 1, 2013
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8,365
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USA.
Af few months ago, I saw a pilot stall his Super Cub on landing and it hit the ground and almost got a wing tip when it went up on it's nose on one wheel and the prop hit the ground and threw large clods of dirt and grass in the air. Nothing was checked and still flying as if nothing happen.

Lots of crazies out there.
 

Tommy222

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Joined
Mar 23, 2019
Messages
11
Been thinking about this, the OP is looking for ways to save money by using a engine that cost less because of its reputation. There most likely is no one that hasn’t been down this road, so nothing new.
I’ve been in Aviation for 54 years so take what I say with a grain of salt been twisted around too many times,lol. OK new approach: forget about engines that aren’t supported or that have bad rep.’s. You say you have a big engine compartment so use it. The O-470 is one of the best engines ever made. Parts are readily available and price is reasonable ( for airplane parts) . You get 230 Hp and pulled back will burn 10GPH’s. They are smooth running and after market parts are everywhere. What you will save on maintenance will very easily pay for the little bit extra you spend on gas. Your going to hear lots of things like balance and aircraft feel etc. from the big engine but all I have to say is you get used to what you fly and HP is always a good thing. Best of luck
 

pictsidhe

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Jul 15, 2014
Messages
8,531
Location
North Carolina
For an HBA, picking an engine that goes 4000hrs to overhaul seems overkill. If you keep your plane a long time, you might do 1/10 of that in recreational flying. An engine with 500+hrs left in it would be fine for almost all of us.
 
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