Who here has no need/intention to add ADS-B OUT?

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Tailwind_Fan

Active Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2020
Messages
31
Location
Southern California deserts....
I laugh because my old Tri Pacer has the old ELT on the rear passenger door, and I have no intention of installing an ADSB out functionality on it. I do have an ADSB In stratux that I put together last year. There’s a lot of airspace in Eastern and central California that doesn’t require ADSB, and on the odd occasion that I need to travel into that airspace I’ll use the online access tool.

-Alana
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,503
Location
Memphis, TN
US transponders use 978 for Mode C hence UAT ADSB, and 1070 is Mode S for that version. That’s how airplanes talk to each other. The gig frequency is the satellite connection. The sat connection with a GPS location transmitted is the functional difference between it and TCAS. The boxes got smaller and cheaper. TCAS was probably $100,000 box when it came out.
 

Bootlegger60

New Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2020
Messages
2
My home airport is just inside the mem mode c veil, if the FAA would have limited it to the class b so I could fly under the shelf, I would not have installed it.
 

BBerson

Light Plane Philosopher
HBA Supporter
Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
14,732
Location
Port Townsend WA
You still need a mode c transponder, though. If you already have one of those (I don't) then adding ADS-B isn't that big a deal.
I think the latest from uvionics (or whatever it is) has a transponder included. The unit fits in the taillight socket.
 

Bill-Higdon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
1,168
Location
Salem, Oregon, USA
US transponders use 978 for Mode C hence UAT ADSB, and 1070 is Mode S for that version. That’s how airplanes talk to each other. The gig frequency is the satellite connection. The sat connection with a GPS location transmitted is the functional difference between it and TCAS. The boxes got smaller and cheaper. TCAS was probably $100,000 box when it came out.
From Automatic Direction Finding Equipment (ADF) & Transponders
"

3-71K3: What are the transmit and receive frequencies of an aircraft’s mode C transponder operating in the Air Traffic Control RADAR Beacon System (ATCRBS)?

Transmit at 1090 MHz, and receive at 1030 MHz


Transmit at 1030 kHz, and receive at 1090 kHz


Transmit at 1090 kHz, and receive at 1030 kHz


Transmit at 1030 MHz, and receive at 1090 MHz"
 

Rik-

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2019
Messages
439
Location
San Rafael, California
I laugh because my old Tri Pacer has the old ELT on the rear passenger door, and I have no intention of installing an ADSB out functionality on it. I do have an ADSB In stratux that I put together last year. There’s a lot of airspace in Eastern and central California that doesn’t require ADSB, and on the odd occasion that I need to travel into that airspace I’ll use the online access tool.

-Alana
What is this online access tool that can eliminate the ADSB requirement?
 

Wanttaja

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,699
Location
Seattle, WA
I think the latest from uvionics (or whatever it is) has a transponder included. The unit fits in the taillight socket.
One of the Fly Baby crowd just installed one of these. Small control head in the cockpit, combined transponder/ADS-B out in the tail. Sounds like a pretty slick unit. Cost was about the same as my Microair transponder and my Skybeacon installed, with a lot less hassle.
1614180206401.png
Ron Wanttaja
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,503
Location
Memphis, TN
Uavionics keeps stepping the game up.
The UAT uses the 976 MHz freq area for distance measurement by using the DME signals. The 1070 freq area is standard signal and the mode S setups can calculate distance internally. The FAA hoped all the GA VFR would have bought UAT and left the 1070 for the IFR, but gadget hungry, most went all the way. The FAA waver is per flight. There is a page on the FAA site to schedule.
 

Bill-Higdon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
1,168
Location
Salem, Oregon, USA
Because I have family in Canada I would need 1070 Mhz to fly up to visit them and the Uavionics tailbeaconx checks multiple for a very good price
 

FinnFlyer

Active Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Messages
44
Location
Bell, FL
Nice. How close to the river are you?
BJC
Normally 1/4 mile but getting closer day by day. Runway may start flooding next week ...

Finn

(Second flight this morning of N214FL RV-4 Mazda 13B Renesis (50 min flight). Too over-propped to develop full horsepower and too restrictive openings in/out of radiators (A/C evap cores) for proper coolant flow. I guess they don't call it "experimental" for nothing.)
 

pfarber

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
764
Location
Pennsylvania
You will have access to C and B airports by calling the ATC facility and requesting a deviation from ADSB requirements.
You MIGHT be able to do this once or twice, but from what I've read, it you use it to get out of ADS-B you'll get a paddling. It's supposed to be to get to a shop that can install the units. So far I have not heard of anyone getting a nastygram.

I know you can zig zag all over and miss airspace
You might want to look at a map. LOTS of non-ADS-B area out there. I can fly PA->FL and maybe add 50-100 miles to get around a Mode-C veil and some Class C's. Thing is, transit through a Bravo is never a given, even with VFR corridors. And for me, the major PITA is the DC area with its own special rules to transit.

The 10k altitude restriction seems arbitrary, why 10K? Why not up to Class 'A'? Mode C worked fine for decades. IIRC Centers do have *some* ADS-B integration, but that high up Radar LOS should be pretty good.
 

Marc Zeitlin

Exalted Grand Poobah
Joined
Dec 11, 2015
Messages
895
Location
Tehachapi, CA
The 10k altitude restriction seems arbitrary, why 10K? Why not up to Class 'A'?...
Because the ADS-B required airspace is effectively the same as transponder required airspace, and transponders are required above 10K ft. (with the 2500 ft. AGL exception).

So if you need a transponder to fly somewhere, you also need ADS-B now. You'd have to go back the transponder requirement setting period to determine why they chose 10K ft. MSL.
 

Turd Ferguson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2008
Messages
5,547
Location
Upper midwest in a house
You MIGHT be able to do this once or twice, but from what I've read, it you use it to get out of ADS-B you'll get a paddling. It's supposed to be to get to a shop that can install the units. So far I have not heard of anyone getting a nastygram.
I doubt you'll ever hear of someone getting a nastygram because it's permitted under the FARs.

There are two published deviations in the ADSB reg. One for when your ADSB is inop and you need to get somewhere to get it repaired. The other is for when ADSB is not installed with no limits or limitations on when, where or how often.
 
Top