Who Certifies Avionics

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gtae07

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The FAA (sort of).

Aircraft and engines get type certificates; avionics do not. They're typically approved under a TSO (technical standard order) and then incorporated on the aircraft in some way (e.g. 337, STC, TC, etc).

With very fancy avionics that are integrated into the aircraft (think airliner and business jet cockpits) they more likely get approved as part of the aircraft TC--you aren't likely going to go out and buy a Primus Epic system as a retrofit for your little airplane.
 

TFF

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You apply for the TSO to the FAA and have accepted independent lab results presented.
 

Aerowerx

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Radio transmitters, receivers, and transceivers would have to be type accepted by the FCC, in addition to the FAA certification.

This includes transponders, radar, ELT, etc.

The only service that does not require type certification is Amateur (ham) radio, and certain extremely low power equipment.
 

fredoyster

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Some incomplete answers here, to an incomplete question. Basically, anything that transmits needs to have FCC (or your government's equivalent) certification, called "equipment authorization" (formerly known as type approval or acceptance). Depending on the type, it can be manufacturer assertion, or based on FCC or authorized lab tests. Receivers generate some signals and must be certified too, but this is typically test/assertion from the mfr rather than from FCC. Some avionics need to meet an FAA Technical Standard Order specification, and in most cases can't be made without TSO authorization from FAA (which includes quality systems and support audits,) but if a TSO is not required, FAA is only involved when approving the installation (in a type-certificated aircraft.) For years there were TSO and non-TSO versions of the same radios, such as the King KX170/175 series. General aviation mostly used non-TSO while Part 135 carriers often required TSO equipment even for comms, audio panels etc.
 

Richard6

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Some incomplete answers here, to an incomplete question. Basically, anything that transmits needs to have FCC (or your government's equivalent) certification, called "equipment authorization" (formerly known as type approval or acceptance). Depending on the type, it can be manufacturer assertion, or based on FCC or authorized lab tests.
That may be true for aircraft radio equipment, but as someone else said, Ham radio equipment does not have this requirement.

Richard
 

TFF

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Ham gets to use its frequencies as they wish, experimental radio. They cant interfere with other frequencies though. FCC certification is not as tough as FAA. Frequency interference and precision is easy to measure. FAA wants foolproof.
 
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