which compressor?

Discussion in 'Finishing Techniques' started by jgnunn, Apr 19, 2006.

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  1. Apr 19, 2006 #1

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

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    hey guys. I need to upgrade my compressor. It will be used for spraying epoxy primer on the fuselage [tube]. Will this one suffice?

    HUSKY
    8 Gallon Air Compressor

    Model FP2205link
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2006
  2. Apr 20, 2006 #2

    Craig

    Craig

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    Air volume

    Beej -

    Take a look at the literature supplied with your spray gun - it will give a number for SFCM at a certain pressure. That is the number you need.

    Eight gallons of air forms a reasonable supply for home spraying, but you need to make sure hta thte compressor supplies the volume that you need. The one you selected is 4.0 sfcm @ 40 psi, 2.6 at 90 - is that enough?

    Use as large of a diameter hose as you can afford.

    I used a similar one to paint many things, and do many repairs on race cars. Just make sure it supplies what you need.
     
  3. Apr 20, 2006 #3

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

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    ok, the husky it seems is nowhere good enough. But this one is possibly ok..

    link

    my new spray gun recommends 9.5 cfm @40psi, the above compressor will punch out 8.8 cfm 40 psi and is 21 gallons...this is obviously borderline. But the price is awesome...afterall, its only for fuselage priming...im gonna worry about the big fabric paint covering job in 18 months or so...

    anyone have feedback?
     
  4. Apr 21, 2006 #4

    Craig

    Craig

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    Great

    Looks as tho it will do the job, Beej.

    I am using a Craftsman 5 HP, wish it were bigger, but it is about as big as I can get and stay with 120 VAC.

    BTW - in setting the pressure for spraying, hook up the empty spray gun, and pull the trigger, then adjust the regulator to give you 40 psi while the air is flowing. Unless you have a gauge at the gun end of the hose.

    Air hoses are like water hoses - lots of friction loss. That's why I told you to get as large a diameter as possible.
     
  5. Apr 21, 2006 #5

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

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    cheers sir
     
  6. Apr 21, 2006 #6

    orion

    orion

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    One other thing you might want to consider, to expand on what Craig pointed out above, not only are air hoses "like" water hoses, they too can, and often do, contain and flow quite a bit of water along with that compressed air. The water comes from the atmosphere which, when compressed, will condense the moisture out of suspension. As the compressed air flows along the hose, so does quite a bit of the water.

    And for air compressors that use an oil bath pump, that air can also include just a bit of oil. Neither of these is good for paint application unless you do all that's necessary to get those contaminants out. Actually, I think the air compressor you indicated has a dry pump so that isn't an issue.

    But in order to get the water out, it is often a good idea to place a water seperator in the line. This pools much of the moisutre in a bowl, which needs to be periodically emptied. It's also a good idea to incorporate a filter after the water separator and finally, to get the last of the moisture, place a dessicant filter just at the base of the spray gun. You can set this filtration up as a seperate line, just for painting - you really don't need all that for running air tools, although the water separator is still a good idea so that your tools are protected from internal corrosion.
     
  7. Apr 21, 2006 #7

    Craig

    Craig

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    Forgot

    I have been using the water & oil separator, and filters, for so long that I sometimes forget they are in the lines!

    Be sure to drain the air tank at least once a month - especially during humid months, you'll be surprised how much water can accumulate in a 30-gal. tank!

    Thanks for reminding us of this, Orion. Done with your flying wing project yet? Help out that guy from India with a $7,000 budget. How about a Hummelbird for him?
     
  8. Apr 21, 2006 #8

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

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    a buddy told me to get a water reservoir..that the same thing? thanks for the advice..
     

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