Where to look for source of temporary electrical system failure?

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Rhino

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You guys should see the wiring diagrams for the newer Cessnas. Instead of showing each circuit on its own page, they have multiple circuits on each page, and each page deals with a section so you need to be flipping back and forth endlessy when trying to trace a circuit. Those airplanes have six busses, too. Troubleshooting is no fun.
Sounds like my Air Force days, though admittedly we had a whole bunch of systems you could never depict on just one fold-out page. The aircraft I spent the most time flying and working on, the RC-135, had almost all of our systems interconnected, so it wasn't possible to depict a single system in some cases, even on multiple pages. As much of a pain as that was, thinking about it does make me nostalgic.
 

mcrae0104

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Early in my career, I had to deal with H size blue prints (not blue line drawings) of power plant wiring diagrams, with, literally, hundreds of conductors per print. It usually took six or eight prints to trace an entire circuit.
Rarely have I encountered blue lines, but they always seem to survive better than blue prints. I miss tactile media like that (hence my avatar).
 

BBerson

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So toggling off and on wouldn't work until the switch had cooled down, which it did after sitting on the ground for a while.
I don't see any circuit breakers that reset after cooling down and toggling the master switch.
But I do see some "not FAA approved" electronic circuit breakers in the Aircraft Spruce (2016) catalog.
They shut down with over or under voltage and reset by toggling the master.
Might be what happened.
 
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