What were the reasons for Quicksilver to be where they are today?

Discussion in 'The light stuff area' started by erkki67, Oct 4, 2019.

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  1. Oct 8, 2019 #41

    pwood66889

    pwood66889

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    "the airplane market isn't "really" finance friendly for the average ultralight enthusiast"
    Which squares with some of my thinking, Dill. What is it in the bank's thinking that keeps them from taking on a flying machine; not just ultralights?
    All my purchases of flyables have been cash. Do too many people crash and die before pay off? Just wondering.
     
  2. Oct 8, 2019 #42

    MadProfessor8138

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    I would think the issue with financing an aircraft stems from the repossession,resale and fluctuating value of the aircraft.
    It's difficult for a lending institution to recoupe their investment if someone defaults on the loan.

    Kevin
     
  3. Oct 8, 2019 #43

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    No insurance, no bank loans.
     
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  4. Oct 8, 2019 #44

    bmcj

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    Wouldn’t that be the “Soaring Over California” ride at Disneyland’s California Adventure?
     
  5. Oct 10, 2019 #45

    Bille Floyd

    Bille Floyd

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    @ Dana :
    I Really "Like" your avatar !!!
    How big a steak will i take ; to get a ride in that ?

    About the towing thing :
    I lost both legs below the knee in a pay-out winch towing accident
    in 2007, and i have no desire to ever tow-up in anything , ever again .
    It's the reason why i'm interested in an engine, with a folding prop,
    for my Rigid-wing Hang glider, to get me up to altitude so i can
    catch a thermal. I Really Like thermalling ; don't like running off
    a mountain , with two fake legs , to do it !!

    I still have dreams about that first flight i had, in the quicksilver,E model
    nearly 40 years ago ; bummer that company had to give it up !!

    Bille
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2019
  6. Oct 10, 2019 #46

    Dana

    Dana

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    About 15 years ago in a moment of madness I resurrected an old Weightshift Quick with the 15HP Yamaha engine that a friend had stored in his barn for years. Crowhopped it a bunch of times, then lost it on final on the first trip around the pattern. Walked with a cane for several months and sold the wreckage to another optimist. If I'd lived in the midwest surrounded by endless farm fields where I could land in any direction I might have tried again, but the small airport I was flying from was just too tight... I went back to paramotors until the airport closed and then bought a Kolb Ultrastar which I kept in a trailer and flew at another airport. Another guy in the area had a North Wings soaring trike with a 28HP Simonini engine, and there were a couple of guys around with Mosquito powered harnesses (which were a lot of work to set up and launch compared to a paramotor!)

    Sometime in the early 1980s I took a ride (er, "instructional flight") in an Eipper MX somewhere in the LA area. Around the same time I bought a Taylorcraft and kept it at Lakewood, NJ, where there was a lot of ultralight activity as well as a skydiving operation and an EAA chapter, but the three groups mostly kept to themselves. I probably would have hung out with the UL guys eventually, but one day the airport owner saw me in my T-Craft doing snap rolls on downwind in the traffic pattern (I was a foolish twentysomething at the time) and told me I wasn't welcome at that airport any more.
     
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  7. Oct 10, 2019 #47

    bmcj

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    Do you recall where that was or anything about the airport or aircraft or pilot? If it was Flabob, you most likely flew with me.
     
  8. Oct 10, 2019 #48

    Dana

    Dana

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    That would have been a small world! But no, I checked my old logbook and seems I misrembered... it was Chula Vista in 1985 (those days I took frequent business trips to both LA and San Diego).
     
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  9. Oct 10, 2019 #49

    Bille Floyd

    Bille Floyd

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    Sounds like You flew with a Bunch of people , in your day ?

    Flying can be Really addictive ; and the Quicksilver helped to fuel
    my addiction to flying !

    Bille
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2019
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  10. Oct 10, 2019 #50

    radfordc

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    About 20 years ago I acquired a Quicksilver weighshift with a 10 hp Kawasaki (I think). I flew it several times successfully, but I got slow on final one day....it stalled, dropped the nose and went into the ground with me pushing full out on the down tubes (what the HG guys call a "whack". Bent both tubes but I only got a couple of bruises. That pretty much cured me of flying that plane. I repaired the plane and sold it to a doctor who needed to replace his friend's QS that he had totaled in a crash. The doctor later had a Pitts S-12 that he also crashed (fatal for him and his pax).
     
  11. Oct 14, 2019 #51

    Dillpickle

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    It CAN be registered E-AB, but is also sold fully built and ready to fly by Pitman Air in Northern California. Bobby Bailey goes to Red Bluff a few times a year to crank out parts and planes. Ed Pitman wrote, submitted to the FAA, and maintains the exemption to allow commercial towing for profit using "grandfathered" two place trainer Dragonflys, but the factory built airplanes don't need it. The aircraft LOOKS deceptively simple, but is not. Nearly every metal part is either welded stainless or anodized aluminum because of the aircraft's exposure to salt air in coastal areas. It is a 75 thousand dollar factory airplane, and can easily tow more than 500 lbs.The thing is built more like a truck than ANYTHING remotely resembling a Quicksilver.
     
  12. Oct 14, 2019 #52

    Dillpickle

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    Insurability DRIVES lending. Not just the object financed, but the person as well. Billion dollar plus mortgage pools, single homes, and the Bike my kid wanted all require insurability. Interestingly enough, Insurance on a 50% down bike for a 19 year old was TWO GRAND a year. Same bike, bought for cash and PLPD'd was less than a hundred. Underwriters hate risk. Back when I was worth something to an Employer, they had me insured for $800,000 grand. My boss was complaining about the added risk of me being a private pilot costing the company more, lol.
     
  13. Oct 15, 2019 #53

    pwood66889

    pwood66889

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    Well, Dill, I certainly agree that lenders hate risk. Yet that is part of what interest on the loan is supposed to take care of. Sounds like they are getting together on it.
    The problem with risk is that it can be perceived as bigger than it mathematically is. People hate the down side more than the up.
    Thanks for your comment.
     

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