What type of flying machines is this ?

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Pops

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My neighbor and his wife was out walking at about 5 AM this morning and took this picture with his cell phone. He was standing in his driveway and the electric pole and wires are for the house across the road. The objects are coming from the northeast going southwest. The ridge runs parallel to the runway on the south east side. What is the morning sun reflecting from ?
Answers ?

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Kyle Boatright

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If the objects were going SW to NE, I'd offer that they may be part of one of those new satellite constellations being launched by private firms. Most satellites move West to East because the rocket gets a boost from the earth's rotation.
 

jedi

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Can you give a better time line? Did the dots and dashes form as a series traveling from NE to SW and were they relatively stationary but progressing like an intermittent contrail? Was the location along an airway that is commonly used?

Could it be a Fed X passing through a series of waves on the way to LAX? I believe where was a cold front to the north parallel to the route.

Did it look to be much higher than normal aircraft?
 

bmcj

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The SpaceX Starlink satellite network looks like that not too long after deployment but before they have a chance to spread themselves to their final locations. 60 satellites deployed at one time. Based on the sunrise angle, it looks like a perfect time to light up a trail of Starlink satellites. They just launched a cluster the other day, so that timing supports my conjecture.
 

fly2kads

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Those things have astronomers all riled up. They are apparently reflective enough to mess with images from telescopes on earth.
 

choppergirl

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I'm going to use the app to find out when they'll pass over, and at the exact right time tell my family, "Quick, go outside! Look at the sky! I just read a tweet from the President that aliens are putting a blockaid around the planet this very moment to contain mankind! And it has nothing to do with the virus!"
 
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Pops

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Wish I had seen it. 5 am is a little early for me in my latter years.
 

RonL

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30 dots match the number of satellites I remember they were putting up.

edit: looks like there were 60, are there two trains of them?
 
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rbarnes

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Starlink: another Muskovian delusion destined for failure.
The launch cost alone to put 10's of thousands of satellites alone in orbit makes it economically unfeasible. The whole idea is to bring internet to anywhere on the planet, but the only places on the planet that can afford and pay the subscription cost already have blanket cell coverage.
 

Yellowhammer

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Starlink: another Muskovian delusion destined for failure.
The launch cost alone to put 10's of thousands of satellites alone in orbit makes it economically unfeasible. The whole idea is to bring internet to anywhere on the planet, but the only places on the planet that can afford and pay the subscription cost already have blanket cell coverage.

Well said and stated sir!
 

AdrianS

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Starlink: another Muskovian delusion destined for failure.
The launch cost alone to put 10's of thousands of satellites alone in orbit makes it economically unfeasible. The whole idea is to bring internet to anywhere on the planet, but the only places on the planet that can afford and pay the subscription cost already have blanket cell coverage.
I disagree.
There's lots of the planet with poor or no internet that will be willing to pay.
One satellite dish + a micro-cell, and you have internet & mobile.
There's plenty of people in remote Aus who would pay for this, let alone Africa.
 

gtae07

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I disagree.
There's lots of the planet with poor or no internet that will be willing to pay.
One satellite dish + a micro-cell, and you have internet & mobile.
There's plenty of people in remote Aus who would pay for this, let alone Africa.
There are also plenty of people in well-off areas who are fed up with their current provider and would switch if an option were available. I would.
 

rbarnes

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I disagree.
There's lots of the planet with poor or no internet that will be willing to pay.
One satellite dish + a micro-cell, and you have internet & mobile.
There's plenty of people in remote Aus who would pay for this, let alone Africa.
That's great, there are also lots of people in remote US and Canada that would pay as well.... unfortunately there are not enough of them to financially support Starlink. As for Africa and Central Asia, those people live off about $50-100/mnth (or less) ... how are they going to afford $50/mnth satellite internet ?

Sirius/XM was a great idea too ..... and has never made a single dime in profit.
Starlink's one real competitor OneWeb just figured this out and went bankrupt.

The math does not add up. If mine is right you're looking at something around $25 billion in launch cost alone, plus the satellites, plus the ground networking system, plus satellite replacement maintenance, and on and on. It's a fantasy.... even if you could sign up a billion people to use it, there is no way the system could handle the bandwidth of that many users all at once through the satellites. The fiber optic hard wired system currently used is buckling under the strain of the Wuhan-Virus work from home shift, much less a wireless system.
 

AdrianS

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You are wrong about Africa / Central Asia, IMO.
The average person is poor, true - but they're not all average: and even 0.1% of the population is a lot of people.
 
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