What radio did the L-4 Grasshopper use?

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Rrtaya_Tsamsiyu

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Does anyone know what type of radio was used in the WW2 scout plane, the L-4 Grasshopper? i haven't been able to find any info on this
 

TFF

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My guess would be a hard mounted version of the backpack radios the troops used, if not caring one in the pack.
 

bmcj

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If you are looking for display purposes, that's one thing, but if you are planning on using it or flying with it, then you have problems. In addition to being heavier than modern radios, the old radios don't have the channel segregation that the new radios do. I'm sure the FCC and FAA will not allow the use of the old radios because their channels spread across multiple current channels.
 

Rrtaya_Tsamsiyu

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Thanks TFF, i didn't think of that before. i wouldn't be surprised if that's what it was.

bmcj, i'm hoping to find one working on the WW2 channels. their are already WW2 radios used in the reenactments i've been to, as far as i know there's nothing official in the US that uses those channels anymore. im pretty sure all of the WW2 frequencies are lower than the ones used now. As far as weight, i would usually only have it during the reenactments.
 

Aerowerx

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bmcj, i'm hoping to find one working on the WW2 channels. their are already WW2 radios used in the reenactments i've been to, as far as i know there's nothing official in the US that uses those channels anymore. im pretty sure all of the WW2 frequencies are lower than the ones used now. As far as weight, i would usually only have it during the reenactments.
I know this is an old thread, but I just had to answer.

If the old WW2 radios are actually being used during the reenactments then they are most likely using the Amateur Radio frequencies and those using them have a Ham Radio license. Many of those old military radios already operate on those bands, so would need no conversions. Amateur radio has a lot less restrictions on what equipment can be used.

Most likely the frequencies used where between 2 MHz and 5 MHz to coordinate with ground forces.
 

Aerowerx

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Neat little box. But there has to be a companion receiver somewhere. Maybe in the canvas case in one of the photos?

It is a bit fuzzy, but I read the crystal frequency as 5495.634 MHz...uh, sorry. That would be 5495.634 MCs in WW2.

To convert from Megacycles to Megahertz... Megahertz = Megacycles * sqrt(4)/2:gig:
 

Dana

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It is a bit fuzzy, but I read the crystal frequency as 5495.634 MHz...uh, sorry. That would be 5495.634 MCs in WW2.

To convert from Megacycles to Megahertz... Megahertz = Megacycles * sqrt(4)/2:gig:
You're asking to get "megahert'. :)

Back then, it would have been kc (khz) not mc/mhz. I don't think anything over 10mhz was in general use back then.

Dana

Any man who can drive safely while kissing a pretty girl is simply not giving the kiss the attention it deserves ~ Albert Einstein
 

Pops

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Yes, the antenna is reeled out in flight to use the radio. Also, he is not setting in an Piper L-4. The radio man sets backwards in the L-4 faceing the radio and has a strap the latches to each side for a back rest. Of course, all the L-4 rear glass is not in this aircraft. There is a 1943 Piper L-4 in my hanger.
I think the same radio that was used in the L-4 is the same radio that was used in my neighbors 1943 Ford Jeep.
Dan
 

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Aerowerx

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Back then, it would have been kc (khz) not mc/mhz. I don't think anything over 10mhz was in general use back then.
Ooops! :emb: My bad! The crystal frequency would be 5495.634 Kc not Mcs. The conversion formula to kHz is the same as that for MHz, by the way;).

Actually, they did use frequencies above 10 MHz. Some of the ARC-5 series went up to 120MHz for aircraft (that's were our present 108-136 MHz band originated), and there were tank radios in the 20-30 MHz range.

Also, you are forgetting about some of the later radar units that would have operated around 5000 Mcs.
 

cluttonfred

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Aerowerx is right about the transmitter and receiver. The Wikipedia entry on the Taylorcraft L-2 includes this note:

Avionics
Learadio AMR-12 Receiver & AMT-12 Transmitter (L-2); RCA AVR-20A (L-2A); RCA AVT-15A or AVT-112 (Some L-2A, L-2M); Slipstream powered generator: Champion Model W612-6V
And the source is listed as "Pilots Flight Operating Instructions, Army Model L-2, L-2A, L-2B, and L-2M Airplanes," T.O. No. 01-135DA-1 1944, pp. 18-20. So if you have or can find the "Pilots Flight Operating Instructions, Army Model L-4..." then you should be able to identify the exact radio installation for each model of L-4.

Fun fact: I believe that the "Lear" in "Learadio" is none other than Bill Lear of Learjet fame, who got his start in the radio business and helped found Motorola.

PS--The RCA models appear to have been more common, so those are a pretty likely answer for your L-4 question. Here are some photos of both transmitter and receiver: http://www.qsl.net/ab0cw/AVT_AVR.htm
 

Pops

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The RCA model is what is in my neighbors 1943 Jeep. You will notice that they are 6 volt powered. Ford autos were 6 Volt, positive ground until 1956 when they went to a 12 volt, negative ground system. Dan
 
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