What is your biggest gripe about your hangar?

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dwalker

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If interest rates head up, this might be seen as a good time when viewed in retrospect.
I wonder if there's a way to do it that protects your interests. I've heard stories of folks that did this, then years later the residents/owners voted in rules that made the place undesirable to the guy who first took the risk and built it.
I think you have to rule it as a benevolent dictator with contracts in place that prevent mob rule, much like the way the motorsport country clubs are run and less like the way golfing communities are run. Something along the lines of no HOA as such can ever exist such that it has any authority to establish or enforce covenants of its own making. My current community is non-HOA, and a couple of rebel attempts have been made to establish one, but there is no way to do so.

IF I were to do this, and again I am sorely tempted and after this summer will need a new project to keep me busy, I would simply structure it so that to purchase a bare plot you agree to have a hangar constructed within 1 year of closing, and a home built within two years of closing, with a minimum of say, 2000sqft. Barndominiums or hangar home designs would need some sort of standard as well, but nothing a guy looking for a hangar in an airpark would object to. Again, much like the motorsport country clubs.
 

TFF

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In the Nashville area, they might think you are putting in a regular subdivision and crank the price up. If they know airplanes are going in they might block it.
Sadly I had a friend who bought a private paved runway in Mississippi near Memphis. His plan was to turn it into an airpark. He didn’t make through Covid right after Christmas. I think he payed more for it than when the the runway was attached to a house sale.

There is another airpark near by him with grass. It has ups and downs because in the area the build buy-in is higher than the average local person wanting to buy into. They literally have nice stuff with homes falling in next to them. They tried to make it too nice and out classed themselves in the wrong way.
 

dwalker

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In the Nashville area, they might think you are putting in a regular subdivision and crank the price up. If they know airplanes are going in they might block it.
Sadly I had a friend who bought a private paved runway in Mississippi near Memphis. His plan was to turn it into an airpark. He didn’t make through Covid right after Christmas. I think he payed more for it than when the the runway was attached to a house sale.

There is another airpark near by him with grass. It has ups and downs because in the area the build buy-in is higher than the average local person wanting to buy into. They literally have nice stuff with homes falling in next to them. They tried to make it too nice and out classed themselves in the wrong way.
You are so right about even mentioning subdivision! My current project is building three small houses- cottages really- on about 3 of 21 acres I bought earlier this year. I am outside of Nashville and in the county, which is good, but the county is severely backlogged and keep labeling my project as a subdivision instead of just new construction. On the other side of the property behind a treeline I am constructing a large- 60x100- metal building on concrete pad to use as an equipment storage building, remote office, and workshop and that has sailed through without issue.

IF I do attempt an airpark or similar it would be in the county, and likely another county over, but still reasonably close to where I currently am. In my area at least, there are several airparks/airstrips almost on top of each other. Pull out a sectional and just peek around KMBT/M45, and KMQY. Only issue is they are all grass, no pavement.
 

Vigilant1

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IF I were to do this, and again I am sorely tempted and after this summer will need a new project to keep me busy, I would simply structure it so that to purchase a bare plot you agree to have a hangar constructed within 1 year of closing, and a home built within two years of closing, with a minimum of say, 2000sqft. Barndominiums or hangar home designs would need some sort of standard as well, but nothing a guy looking for a hangar in an airpark would object to. Again, much like the motorsport country clubs.
The infrastructure (water, sewer, power, etc), zoning, and maybe the built-in politics would seem to be less with a place that is just a private airport with hangars and maybe one residence. Of course, that requires proximity to a mix of housing (all price levels) and enough aircraft owners to make it work, with land prices still not out of sight.
A guy that builds a 1 million dollar house cares a lot about the houses and neighbors around him. A guy that builds a deluxe hangar may be slightly miffed that the hangar next to him is a $10k pole barn, but as long as it's not at risk of blowing apart in a stiff breeze and damaging his Citation, he probably won't try to rally the mob to action.
 

Rhino

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Is your airpark paved? I am just about resigned to looking for an airpark property but would need a paved strip, and everything I can find close to me is grass.
The taxiways in the airpark are grass and connect to a grass runway on the airport. But that connects to paved taxiways, two paved runways, and another grass runway. Airport details here. The airpark is on the south side of the airport. Supposedly there are two lots for sale, but I'm not certain of that. The airpark web site is here.

EDIT: The HOA dues are now $400 a year, not $200. They haven't updated the web site yet. Unfortunately the domain is owned by a realtor, and getting changes made is not a simple proposition.
 
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Pops

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The taxiways in the airpark are grass and connect to a grass runway on the airport. But that connects to paved taxiways, two paved runways, and another grass runway. Airport details here. The airpark is on the south side of the airport. Supposedly there are two lots for sale, but I'm not certain of that. The airpark web site is here.

EDIT: The HOA dues are now $400 a year, not $200. They haven't updated the web site yet. Unfortunately the domain is owned by a realtor, and getting changes made is not a simple proposition.
I have a friend that lives at Pleasant Grove.
 

ddsrph

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Where are you in TN?
I live near Lynchburg and my hangar is at Tullahoma (THA). One thing I forgot to mention is how our airport handles land lease. I got a 20 year lease with 20 year renewal. When I sell my hangar the new owner starts the clock over again with a new 20/20 lease.
 

Lynk Aviation

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I know someone who had good results getting a used fire hose the local FD was disposing of. He bought some foam pipe insulation from Home Depot and inserted it into the hose to give it some collapsible cushion, and screwed the whole thing to the bottom of his hangar door. Says he never saw a drop of water after that.


Alarms require communication if you want them to do anything more than just make noise. If you can get internet access there, you can just use one of the wireless Ring systems that sends alerts to your phone. Those systems can be as simple as a single motion activated camera or as complex as having sensors on all the doors and windows. With a phone line, you can install a traditional security system monitored by an alarm company, but there's a monthly cost. Some will use a cell phone connection in lieu of a landline. For that matter, there's a small monthly cost for the Ring system too. I've had, and do have, both kinds of systems, and I've installed both as well. But I don't have any experience with them in a hangar, because mine is only 100 feet from my back door, and I live in an upscale airpark with no traffic anywhere near my hangar.


I may not call anything perfect, but I'm very, very happy with my Higher Power door. Works great, has almost zero headroom (unlike a bifold), and came with two key fobs that work from 50 yards away without even requiring an external antenna. It's also freestanding, so no building prep was required. It just bolts to the concrete.
Briefly on the note of communication, we use 4G connectivity so there is no need to have expensive WiFi ran out to your hangar. you can find a little more info about that here:
 

Rhino

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Maybe this will give you a better idea. The airpark is where I drew the red square.

9B51D8C5-B94F-473E-B3F8-85DC604817C1.jpeg
 

Pops

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I looked at Pleasant Grove. I think the wife said it was too far from town.
Your area of Tenn is nice. My daughter used to live in Huntsville, Al. Used to make lots of flying trips there.
In my F-12, leave in the morning and be back home in the afternoon.
 

Rhino

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We lived in Huntsville while the house was being built.
 

Daleandee

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FWIW ... this is a timely thread as just today I agreed to purchase a 40X40 hangar for what seems a really good price. It's on a grass field that is closer to home. My only concern is the power in the hangar is limited to 20 amps of service. That's much better than no power at all.

I'm certain 20 amps will run the LED lights, coffee pot, small fridge, and scanner. Might have to cycle items on and off when using a small air compressor (1 HP). Don't see a welder being used unless I fire up the generator but I don't use a welder very often.

Ideas on energy conservation are welcome. Don't really see the need for a big screen TV in the hangar as I don't care much for TV watching. Might be OK for putting on some flying vids when folks come around to visit. BBQ grill don't require power ...
 

Vigilant1

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FWIW ... this is a timely thread as just today I agreed to purchase a 40X40 hangar for what seems a really good price. It's on a grass field that is closer to home. My only concern is the power in the hangar is limited to 20 amps of service. That's much better than no power at all.
Dale,
Right, 20 amps is quite a bit, unless you plan to weld with it.
I rent a hangar at my local county airport. I'm probably crazy but I insulated it and installed a hanging propane furnace. 20 amps is all I have available, but that's enough for quite a bit of LED lighting AND the furnace fan, radio, etc.
Enjoy the new-to-you hangar!
Mark
 

Pops

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You will be living like a king. When we got electric in 1950 we had 30 amp service. Had one light bulb hanger down in the ceiling in each room by the wires. No refrigerator, we still used the cellar under the smoke house. Got an electric radio that we could use every night instead of using the battery radio on Sat night.
Now with LED lighting and most everything else, you will be doing great.
In our 2400 sq' house and 3k hanger we use about 330 kw a month from the grid.
 
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Vigilant1

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You will be living like a king. When we got electric in 1950 we had 30 amp service. Had one light bulb hanger down in the ceiling in each room by the wires. No refrigerator, we still used the cellar under the smoke house. Got an electric radio that we could use every night instead of using the battery radio on Sat night.
My wife's grandparents lived in rural Mississippi. When the TVA/REA started running power lines in the 30's, Grandaddy said he didn't want electricity ("costs too much"). Granny normally let him have his way, and she picked her battles carefully. This was one. She demanded that they get electricity, gave no ground, and they got it. He only put in one light and one power receptacle in each room, but that wasn't unusual at the time. Folks could hardly imagine all the ways they'd use electricity.

They didn't get indoor plumbing until the early 60s. Grandaddy couldn't see a need to spend all that money. Then, his son's wife said she'd visit them with the new grandbaby once Grandaddy installed a toilet. So, he did.

Women. They do civilize us. I suppose, like most guys, if left to my own devices I'd probably live in a small cinderblock shack with a fridge, camp stove, and a bathroom with no door. Housecleaning: Hose down the walls, floor, and ceiling into the floor drain once per week. Kinda like a kennel.
 
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bmcj

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I live near Lynchburg and my hangar is at Tullahoma (THA). One thing I forgot to mention is how our airport handles land lease. I got a 20 year lease with 20 year renewal. When I sell my hangar the new owner starts the clock over again with a new 20/20 lease.
Does that mean that you have to sell before 40 years or the airport takes ownership?
 

mcrae0104

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They didn't get indoor plumbing until the early 60s. Grandaddy couldn't see a need to spend all that money. Then, his son's wife said she'd visit them with the new grandbaby once Grandaddy installed a toilet. So, he did.
Similarly, one of my grandfathers grew up in a modest house built before the civil war. When he went away to college, his mother told him he couldn't bring a girl home to meet her unless he installed indoor plumbing (his father, evidently not a plumber, had passed away by then). So of course, he did the same as your grandfather. Some of our family still lives in that house; it has had the roof torn off by a tornado, survived at least one fire that burned down the kitchen, and saw Union troops camping in its front yard under the cypress and magnolia trees. A few summers ago, we had a reunion there, and we figured that with the younger children, the house had now hosted something like seven or eight generations of the family.
 

bmcj

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Similarly, one of my grandfathers grew up in a modest house built before the civil war. When he went away to college, his mother told him he couldn't bring a girl home to meet her unless he installed indoor plumbing (his father, evidently not a plumber, had passed away by then). So of course, he did the same as your grandfather. Some of our family still lives in that house; it has had the roof torn off by a tornado, survived at least one fire that burned down the kitchen, and saw Union troops camping in its front yard under the cypress and magnolia trees. A few summers ago, we had a reunion there, and we figured that with the younger children, the house had now hosted something like seven or eight generations of the family.
Sounds kind of like my story too. When I was young, we lived in what had been my grandparent’s old two story farm house for awhile. We had electricity (barely) with cloth covered wires tacked up along the ceiling with a single hanging light bulb. This was just in the main hallway and up the stairs. The other rooms were lit by oil lamps. No indoor plumbing, but we did have a rain collection cistern under the front porch slab with a good old hand pump (like you see in the old movies) to pump into a bucket, and we had an outhouse down the hill behind the house. I don’t remember if the stove was gas or wood. The house was hit by tornadoes on two different occasions when I was there. The fist time took of part of the roof. The second one took out the kitchen wall, knocking it down over the entry to the storm shelter we were sheltering in; fortunately we were able to dig our way out. We moved back to California after that.
 
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