Quantcast

What is the ultimate bush plane?

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Dan Thomas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5,546
You are all wrong and I'm right: Antonov AN2.

View attachment 103266
Well, except for its size and weight (limiting access to wider, harder strips), its fuel consumption (40 to 52 GPH) and the cost of maintaining and insuring, it's a great bushplane.

They're BIG. I once flew in and parked a Taylorcraft next to an AN -2 at an airshow, in the static display area. The ailerons on the AN-2 were nearly as big as the Taylorcraft's wings.
 

Pilot-34

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
625
You are kidding us right? They are one of the ultimate Bush planes!
That’s pretty much the reason for existing
I think they’re standard for takeoff with a full load of about 5000 pounds is less than 600 feet I’ve seen them leave the ground in quite a bit less than half of that.
They seem to of been built for operating off gravel bars in the middle of rocky rivers and beaches
The landing gear seems like it was built for a semi truck.

The only bad thing I can say for one is I would hate to have to feed it!
 

rbarnes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2015
Messages
313
Location
Texas
I spent a good portion of one Alaskan Summer visiting native historical locations in Prince William sound.
I based out of a camp on Montague Island and had a helicopter assigned to me.
It was a bell jet Ranger on floats.
That might be the ultimate Bush aircraft.
We could go almost anywhere and land almost anywhere and it had the ultimate benefit of any aircraft.

Both the aircraft and its pilot were paid for by someone else.
Helicopters dont count. Those aren't aircraft. They're physics defying circus act.
Scariest thing I've ever seen ? A student helicopter pilot learning to back in to a parking spot next to another helicopter.

AN-2 gets my vote too. Those things are nuts. Remember the wing vortex crash from someone taking off after one ?
 

Pilot-34

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
625
Well I will admit that the helicopter is just a large collection of aircraft parts flying in close formation for the purpose of beating the air into submission......
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
8,025
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
You are kidding us right? They are one of the ultimate Bush planes!
That’s pretty much the reason for existing
I think they’re standard for takeoff with a full load of about 5000 pounds is less than 600 feet I’ve seen them leave the ground in quite a bit less than half of that.
They seem to of been built for operating off gravel bars in the middle of rocky rivers and beaches
The landing gear seems like it was built for a semi truck.

The only bad thing I can say for one is I would hate to have to feed it!
The AN-2 was apparently a good enough bush plane that it scared the **** out of Cessna so badly (during development of the Caravan) that they lobbied and cried and whimpered and browbeat the FAA into blocking any way for people to get it certified and imported into the US. The AN-2 would have been of incredible value in Alaska, as it was designed exactly for a nearly identical mission. I'm pretty sure that 5000 pounds of payload out of a 600 foot strip would be a huge game-changer in AK. That's getting up into DC-3 territory I believe.
 

Pilot-34

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
625
Imagine Carbon fiber one with a turboprop......


Yeah they are working on that
 

Tiger Tim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
3,401
Location
Thunder Bay
They're BIG. I once flew in and parked a Taylorcraft next to an AN -2 at an airshow, in the static display area. The ailerons on the AN-2 were nearly as big as the Taylorcraft's wings.
Somewhere on the forum there was recently posted a picture of a single seat biplane that used AN-2 ailerons for wings.

And I too think a Colt would be an awesome party barge for remote places if money was no object. I’ll take mine with extra large tundra tires and at least 1600hp worth or turbine on the nose. ”Draco, who?

If I’m paying for it, then some sort of Cub-ish homebuilt is fine. I feel guilty leaving a fabric covered airplane outside all year so if hangarage was an issue then probably a CH-701. I wonder if it would be at all feasible to do a tandem seat taildragger based on the 701?
 

Pilot-34

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
625
Lol I have a relative that is trying to buy one for just that purpose in a package deal that also includes a Russian mil-2 helicopter
Apparently “-2” means bush country party barge in Russian!
 

Ardent

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2007
Messages
21
I could definitely see a use for the AN2 in the Northwest, we run a 2100 sq mile outfitting territory just south of the Alaska border. We move a lot of loads for our operation along the Alaska border here in BC with a hired 900hp Caravan, Beavers, a turbine Otter, and on the light end our recently sold 300hp Wilga 2000.

The Grumman Goose still works for a living on our coast, and an AN2 on floats would fit in nicely. Fuel burn, at 3/4s of a gallon a minute, is comparable to the turbines, and the same as the helicopter I fly in the off season gig that only lifts 2000lbs of payload. Maintenance I imagined would be much cheaper.

This all said, the Beaver is the gold standard for a reason. 90% of our loads fit in the Beaver, and it’s the cheapest to operate of the aircraft we hire (any time we needed more than a Wilga 2000), and I think that ratio fits for most bush flying, the Beaver is usually enough. I’d love to own an amphib Beaver one day as well, may be my next purchase for work, though I’d rarely get to operate it for fun. I do think an AN2 on floats would find enough work here though, it wouldn’t take over the market, but it would be the “big guy” for every load beyond the SuperVan / Garrett Caravan or Otter.



 

TLAR

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2020
Messages
56
RV-18?
Looks like DR is trying to make the case to Van for a high wing RV
 
Top