What is it???

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bmcj

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It’s not often that I see a plane I don’t recognize, but this one has me stumped. In particular, I’m baffled by the double sets of horizontal tail surfaces.

(Sorry for the image quality, it’s a photo from a television screen.)

CBC6CEAD-6702-4AED-BE95-F829D01C9291.jpeg
 

bmcj

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While I’m at it, here is another plane that someone was asking me about. I know I’ve seen this before, but I can’t remember where or what they called it. Any guesses?

(Something in the back of my brain keeps shouting “Australian”)

FA59F210-540B-46BF-9A92-3F7E1E0921B2.jpeg

7C09EF59-4385-4917-96E4-DBA77329E505.jpeg

DC5CD762-EDDD-41F7-8FB7-C9EF3C298869.jpeg
 

bmcj

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I've always wondered what the hell those were for. The 1900 is the only aircraft I can recall seeing them on.
If I had to guess, I would guess they are to help drop the nose if it ever blanked out the elevator in a stall.
 

SVSUSteve

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If I had to guess, I would guess they are to help drop the nose if it ever blanked out the elevator in a stall.
Interesting thought. It sure looks like a post-design fix for something that was a problem during flight testing. Then again, the 1900 is an ugly aircraft even without that.
 

Dan Thomas

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From http://www.pilotspost.co.za/arn0000012

...we read:

Turning a standard King Air into a 1900 was not a straightforward task. For one thing, the extra fuselage length determined a far wider C of G envelope and managing the stretch meant complying with some stringent standards to maintain longitudinal stability. Beechcraft were at the same time mindful that the ultimate market for the new mini airliner was limited and thus wanted to minimise development costs. One way of meeting that need was to use the King Air 350's wing - at least in terms of plan form. The 1900D's wing is a single-spar version of the King Air's three-section assembly and has a six-foot overall greater span over the 1900C as well as a pair of winglets. To embrace the considerably extended centre of gravity envelope, Beechcraft had to provide greater wetted area to maintain pitch and yaw stability and this they did by adding small fins on the underside of the high horizontal stabiliser and an extra - mini-horizontal stabiliser attached to the rear fuselage. A pair of strakes were added to the underside of the rear empennage to help kick the tail up in the event of an aft C of G stall and to ease the requirement for a yaw damper.
 

Topaz

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If I had to guess, I would guess they are to help drop the nose if it ever blanked out the elevator in a stall.
And/or a quick-easy way to increase horizontal stabilizer area on a design that's been continually enlarged and expanded, without having to re-engineer the entire T-tail. Expediency über alle.

If they move, they're for the autopilot. And not on the T-tail for the same reason as above.

EDIT: Ninja'd by Dan Thomas, who gave a much better explanation.
 

TFF

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Beech 1900D. Has something to do with engine out control. I think it lowers the speed it can fly at if you loose an engine.
 

Topaz

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While I’m at it, here is another plane that someone was asking me about. I know I’ve seen this before, but I can’t remember where or what they called it. Any guesses?
I really have no idea, but I see a lot of SuperFloater lineage in that aft fuselage and tail.
 

Mad MAC

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Hmmm 1900D, love the cabin, makes a beautiful air ambulance, but maintenance wise a piece of junk. Perhaps best summerised as about 2 stretches to far. The landing gear loads crack the rear spar, Tee tail structural cracking, etc, etc.
 

BJC

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.. Perhaps best summerised as about 2 stretches to far.
That nails it. A common problem in many areas of manufacturing. (Want to talk about problems with high pressure high flow centrifugal pumps? Lots of similar issues there.)


BJC
 

SVSUSteve

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Hmmm 1900D, love the cabin, makes a beautiful air ambulance, but maintenance wise a piece of junk. Perhaps best summerised as about 2 stretches to far. The landing gear loads crack the rear spar, Tee tail structural cracking, etc, etc.
It has one of the best cabins to ride in of any commuter turboprop. I kind of wish we had operated a 1900 at the air ambulance outfit I used to work at.

I will always have a fondness for the Saab 340 (mostly due to aesthetics) but I wish the cabin was more comfortable. The only thing that I think gives the 1900 a run for the money is the ATR series. It's just a bloody shame that they have that problem with aileron reversal in icing conditions. I guess you can choose comfort or you can choose not being a beast to maintain or one that is best left to fly in the tropics.
 

Charles_says

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But what are the double tail surfaces, or is that some sort of antenna?
I watched the video full screen ( I have a 39" monitor) and I noticed the following:

@ 00:54 the extra appendages are horizontal [in line with the fuselage]
@ 00:57 there seems to be a slight tilt downward
@ 00:59 they tilt downward at approx 15 deg
@ 01:00 they are horizontal again.

This makes me think maybe they are an adjunct to the elevators.
(??) to assist in landing...
 
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