What does "non-TSO'd" mean?

Discussion in 'Instruments / Avionics / Electrical System' started by Eight Sierra Kilo, Nov 8, 2009.

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  1. Nov 8, 2009 #1

    Eight Sierra Kilo

    Eight Sierra Kilo

    Eight Sierra Kilo

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    Would someone please tell me what non-TSO'd means, as in the Garmin GMA 240 non-TSO'd audio panel?


    Thanks,
    Sam
     
  2. Nov 8, 2009 #2

    BBerson

    BBerson

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    It means the unit does not have an FAA TSO (Technical Standard Order).

    Homebuilts are not required by the FAA to use TSO'd units.
    Usually the non- TSO'd unit is cheaper. It may be the same unit, but the manufacturer can sell it cheaper in many cases, perhaps the liability is reduced.
     
  3. Nov 8, 2009 #3

    Eight Sierra Kilo

    Eight Sierra Kilo

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    Thank you; that makes sense.

    Sam
     
  4. Nov 9, 2009 #4

    Dana

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    To amplify the previous response, anything installed in a non experimental certificated aircraft must be TSO'd

    -Dana

    Chaste: why virgins run.
     
  5. Nov 9, 2009 #5

    BBerson

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    Most of the time, but not always.
    If the original Type Certificated aircraft used non-TSO'd parts or equipment, then an identical non-TSO'd part could be used. Some aircraft have non-TSO'd engine instruments for example.

    At least that is my opinion. These rules are not very easy to follow. See FAR 21.303
    If anybody can explain how some Type Certificated airplane use auto parts, please do so.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2009
  6. Nov 9, 2009 #6

    vortilon

    vortilon

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    If your light aircraft was certified pre 1950 you can carve your own wood propeller and use automotive tires as long as the prop will make the static rpm in the TCDS and the tires will handle the load and speed. Wood propellers need not be Type Certificated per CAR 4.

    Part 23 allows for substitution of parts that are no longer avialable as long as they will do the job. Many old engines such as Le Blonde etc.. have automotive parts like rings and such because the Le Blonde store has been closed for many years.
     
  7. Nov 9, 2009 #7

    BBerson

    BBerson

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    FAR 21.303 allows for aircraft owners to make his own part for any aircraft not just pre 1950. So in theory, I think, it would be possible to make a propeller for any aircraft.
     
  8. Nov 10, 2009 #8

    vortilon

    vortilon

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    04.443 Tires. A landing gear wheel may be equipped with any make or type of tire, provided that the tire is a proper fit on the rim of the wheel and provided that the tire rating of the Airplane Tire Committee of the Tire and Rim Association is not exceeded.

    04.61Propellers. Propellers shall be of a type and design which has been certificated as airworthy in accordance with the requirements of Part 14 or shall have been approved as airworthy in accordance with previous regulations, except that wood propellers of a conventional type for use in light airplanes need not be certificated. In certain cases maximum engine bore limitations are also assigned to propellers. Propellers may be used on any engine provided that the certified power ratings, speed ratings, and bore of the engine are not in excess of the limitations of the propeller as certificated, and further provided that the vibration characteristics of the combination are satisfactory to the Administrator

    This is the basis of which aircraft were type certificated before 1950 and still apply to these airplanes today.
     
  9. Nov 10, 2009 #9

    BBerson

    BBerson

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    But that rule applies to an original factory built airplane, I think. Is that CAR4?

    Replacement parts are a different situation.
     

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