What do you think about "e-soaring"?

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addaon

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I’m not sure how much Skoda can add here — this is a dumb pack (no BMS) with third party cells, they basically did the mechanical and thermal design for the box. You’d do much better to contact the manufacturer of the cells you’re interested in. They tend to be quite responsive and, as discussed previously in this thread, can supply good data sheets.
 

addaon

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Are there any pitfalls to connecting two or more of the larger size (like being discussed) battery packs either in series or parallel?
Just be aware of your BMS limitations. In particular large serial strings mean that your module-to-module comms run over a pretty high voltage differential; this needs some sort of isolation, whether it’s an optocoupler or something built into the BMS IC (TI uses “isoSPI”); but all insulation has its limits.
 

John.Roo

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I’m not sure how much Skoda can add here — this is a dumb pack (no BMS) with third party cells, they basically did the mechanical and thermal design for the box. You’d do much better to contact the manufacturer of the cells you’re interested in. They tend to be quite responsive and, as discussed previously in this thread, can supply good data sheets.
Exactly...
Because this is just a "dumb pack" I would like to know much more details about BMS system used in Enyaq + information about other components we could theoretically use for our "e-soaring" purpose.
Of course it is also possible that Skoda Auto will not share any info...
However it will cost me only time and a bit of money to try it ;)

Specifications of the LGX E78 battery cell from LG Chem for electric vehicles
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1669320916605.png
 

John.Roo

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"The analysis returned 244 Wh/kg energy density for an almost new Model Y 4680 battery cell, compared to 269 Wh/kg for the ubiquitous Panasonic 2170 cells that Tesla uses in its long-range vehicles here in the US. This jibes with recent revelations that the main reason Tesla is using 4680 batteries at the moment is to cut manufacturing costs, rather than any of the other pie-in-the-sky advantages announced on Battery Day a few years back. A Model Y's 4680 pack, for instance, is US$3,600 cheaper to manufacture than one with 2170 cells."


Well.... if price and safety are OK than 244 W / 1 kg is still acceptable number 🤗
 

addaon

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Keep in mind that this is cell density; aviation pack densities tend to run 50% of cell density, and automotive 65%-75% depending mostly on cooling. It wouldn't surprise me if the 4680 pack density matches that of the 2170; but yes, cost cut was the obvious main advantage.
 
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