What did you do on your airplane project today?

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SpruceForest

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Nice. Looks like you do a little wood turning.


BJC
I know it looks like that, but the camera angle is bad... what looks like a lathe is the low-speed grinder on the sharpening bench. I promise I will only do this once...minimal airplane content, but maximum shop stuff.

This is a basement guitar shop and ad hoc airplane shop until I finish cleaning out the garage and get some benches and tables done for the spars and aileron/flaps, etc.

Two repair benches, a finishing bench, an electronics bench, a sharpening station, and two more benches in the back storage room (plus my reloading bench just visible in one shot).

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NE corner... #1 repair bench with a 1951 Martin D-21 in progress. if you spent some time up in Cambridge in Harvard Square coffee houses in the 70's/80's, you definitely heard this guitar. Due out Thursday so that the new owner can play a memorial concert for the old owner (RIP). Full restoration, with just frets, nut, saddle, and a new pickup system to go.

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Opposite direction (looking west to NW corner of shop)...electronics bench and the buffers along the north wall of shop just visible in the shot (you mentioned a lathe... may be the bench grinder just beyond the buffers).

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Looking north from SW corner of shop. The main workbench, #2 repair bench, and the sharpening station... CBN 8" wheel and an aluminum oxide, plus all the other stuff for all those planes, chisels and scrapers. The 6" vise is temporary - once the garage shop opens, I'll move that and an 8" Yost over at another shop out to the airplane shop. Garage is HVAC'd (house was model home in community, so finished garage was office... no need to fight MD heat and humidity until time to move to hanger.

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Reverse perspective looking SW... finishing bench beyond the #2 repair bench and the small machine corner (drill press, 12" disk, spindle sander, 6 x 48, and compressor in the SW corner.

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Looking east from SW corner... larger machines and cyclone/air filter. Wedges back there is a 20 ton press, gas welding rig, and another 400 sf of storage.
 
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SpruceForest

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Thanks. I love seeing workshops, and how people set them up.

Didn’t see a lathe, but I thought that some of the tools hanging on the wall were wood turning tools.


BJC
Ah... my bad! Patternmaker's chisels... super long blades, and a couple of other longer tools for some of the stuff I did before the guitar stuff. Def interested in picking up a lathe one of these days and doing some turning, but everyone I know that has tried to dabble goes off the deep end!
 

Pops

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SpruceForest

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That was a lot of work. I know, I built all the wing parts for 2 four seat Bearhawks. Looks like you still have to rivet on the angle stiffeners on the ribs. Great looking job.
That's a lot of ribs, but they go fast once you get the hang of it!

Yup on the stiffeners... gotta get them alodined and primed, then all those little stiffeners go on... about half way through the nose rib ones, and just milled out the center rib stiffeners... lots of little pieces, but all of them simple 90 degree bends! price of llondine is up about 90 percent! Germany makes a lot of this stuff, and they have no spare natural gas to use in industrial processes, so scarcity!
 

Pops

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That's a lot of ribs, but they go fast once you get the hang of it!

Yup on the stiffeners... gotta get them alodined and primed, then all those little stiffeners go on... about half way through the nose rib ones, and just milled out the center rib stiffeners... lots of little pieces, but all of them simple 90 degree bends! price of llondine is up about 90 percent! Germany makes a lot of this stuff, and they have no spare natural gas to use in industrial processes, so scarcity!
Picture of the wing parts for one Bearhawk less the spar webs, fuel tanks and fiberglass wing tips.
 

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SpruceForest

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Man... feel sort of unproductive that I did not knock out a spare set now... Pops is the man!
 

Pops

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Man... feel sort of unproductive that I did not knock out a spare set now... Pops is the man!
You are right, once in the grove in making a rib, you can knock them out in a short time. I made templates for cutting all the aluminum and used the 4' stomp shear as much as possible. Could make the center part of the rib between spars in about 30 minutes. The long one piece end rib took quite a bit longer. Made a steel drilling jig for drilling all the rivet holes for the stiffing angles and attach angles on each end of the ribs.
On the long winter evening, it sure beats watching the idiot tube. I move a table in front of the patio door of the hanger/shop and watch it snow as I work. Nice.
 

J.L. Frusha

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Having to re-scale my 'plans'. There is such a thing as 'too small', especially for a 6ft+ guy like me. Planning a combination woodworking shop for a dedicated place for making the parts. I can get away with using a portion of a shed, or carport for assembly.
 

bifft

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After hearing many reports of damaged rudders from winds at Osh this year, decided I needed a rudder gust lock. Go for a clamp on the balance. I first tried an H-shaped riveted aluminum piece, but found that a bulge on my top fairing meant it wouldn't slide on (it clears fine when turning, but sticks forward enough to prevent sliding a sheet down in the gap).

So went with two thin steel sheets held together with a 3/16 carriage bolt (there was enough gap at the bottom to fit this in). Epoxied some left over baffle fabric on the inside to protect the paint.

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Actually got it done about two weeks ago, but today is the first time I remember to take it to the airport to make sure it fits. Looks like it will work fine. One of these days will do a real cross country where I need this stuff.
 

karmarepair

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I failed at removing the Camlok retainers and calibrating the Dynon/Princeton fuel gauge on my Sonex (it was too bloody hot, again, to do anything HARD, and the documentation I had from Previous Builders was incomplete), but I continued tightening up the baffling - MY Sonex Aerovee is going to be COOL. And I powered up the Dynon to play around with it, first time since I've owned this project.

Earlier this week was sending in my registration, and other baffling refinements.

Now that I've downloaded the Dynon INSTALLATION manual, I think I have the Rubric ready to complete that. Then comes the fuel flow test, before I install the glareshield and the windscreen.
 

pylon500

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Thanks. I love seeing workshops, and how people set them up.

Didn’t see a lathe, but I thought that some of the tools hanging on the wall were wood turning tools.


BJC
I would be too embarrassed to publish my workshop (any more than I had too), on a public forum🙄
That said, my latest efforts have been back on the undercarriage.
While my initial design called to use a leaf spring that doubled up as the 'scissor link', we came upon some nice lightweight aluminium shock struts capable of around 1,000lbs load, and I redesigned accordingly (I hope).
Here's a quick collage of images;
Landing_Gear_struts.png
The last image shows a temporarily assembled strut, showing the mild rake on the leg.
The 'exploded' view (#2, from L to R), the rotation shaft with pivot pin caps, the main leg, the scissor link clamp halves, the gas strut and a dummy alloy leg.
The next shot is a rough assembly showing the relative location of the gas strut at the top of the leg.
The top right shot is; the main legs, pivots, boxes of machined bits, and the red tubes are the stainless steel tubes to become the telescoping section of the leg.
The machining shot is the cap on the top that will hold the top of the gas strut.
The leg, pivot T and cap are all welded together when finished.
strut_attach_cap.png
Bit of a sequence shot of the top cap being machined.
I am fortunate to have a nearby factory that produces a lot of CNC alloy fittings, and most of their machines are probably loaded with twelve foot lengths of bar stock, that can't use the last 3 or 4 inches worth, which they sell by weight as offcuts, very handy!
 

BJC

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I would be too embarrassed to publish my workshop (any more than I had too), on a public forum🙄
I occasionally organize a “hangar crawl” here at the airpark. I get two responses when I ask people to open their hangars / workshops: “Can’t do it, my hangar is a mess” or “OK, that will motivate me to clean up.”

I enjoy seeing them all, neat and clean or cluttered and messy.


BJC
 

gtae07

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My shop is perpetually a disaster. Part of it is that I am probably somewhat ADD and jump around between lots of projects. I tend to work on one part for a while, get bored with that and jump to something else, and then move to a third item (in one work session!). I am not a neat-and-tidy-organized person by nature and trying to sort and organize things that don't have explicit built-in sorting, like rivets have with part numbers, is extremely mentally taxing and I end up doing like WALL-E with random things on any available flat surface:
wall-e-pixar.gif


I'm also very limited in working time, and spending all the time to get things out and put them away again would frequently eat up all my available time. I just set things down and resume right where I was, at the cost of sometimes spending time looking for stuff.
 

Toobuilder

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After hearing many reports of damaged rudders from winds at Osh this year, decided I needed a rudder gust lock. Go for a clamp on the balance...

Been through that same thought process several times on the Rocket and RV. I had an aluminum "V" shape grab the TE and secure it with bungies and also done the counterbalance "clamp" you had. Never was comfortable with the leverage on that counterbalance tab in "heavy" winds, so ended up with two lengths of PVC pipe that has a notch in one end to snap onto the rudder pedals. Other end wedges against the spar. In effect, its like someone is sitting in the cockpit with feet on the rudder pedals. Cheap, light, and hard to forget on preflight!
 

Victor Bravo

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Well it's my EAA chapter's project not mine personally, but....

Picked up the fuselage kits for our CH-750 Cruzer youth build program today. Sincere thanks to Sebastien Heintz and his great crew at Zenith for keeping us "in the queue" while we were building the wings.

The thermometer display in the Volvosaurus started off at 121 F and after driving a mile or so toward the airport it came down to a chilly 105 F. An LA Summer heat wave is not exactly the ideal environment to be loading and unloading a twelve foot crate.

But SteveL and I had help, thank goodness; our magnificently generous co-conspirator (and occasional HBA participant) Dan Riffe has a small antique 3-wheel Hyster forklift that did exemplary work getting the crate off the trailer and onto the furniture dollies in the chapter hangar.

Saturday we begin the fuselage!
 

dwalker

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Been a while- pretty much all summer has been consumed with the remodel of a property I bought a little over a year ago. The tenants finally moved out and well.. I had to pretty much rebuild the house.

As for cool airplane stuff.. well I will make a video in the next day or so but mostly I have been accumulating yet more parts, and planning how to move forward to actually finish this Dragonfly!. Most important of the bits that came in finally was the long-back ordered tubing for the pedal assemblies, so the obvious next step is to cut, weld, and fit the pedals and brake systems into the cockpit.
In retrospect I made a huge error in the way I paused the project, as coming back to it after we wrapped up the last 10 weeks of remodel work I was really pretty lost as to where I had left off, where I had planned to go next and what I had on hand and what I needed to get to move forward. Going forward any significant pause in work will have to be done in such a way that it takes maybe a day to pick everything back up and not a week of sorting things out.
 

Toobuilder

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Last few days have been with me in my blistering hot shop cleaning up a bunch of fiberglass on the Rocket. First was the embarassing half finished wheelpants (done, for the moment), and right behind it is the lower cowl (still a day or two of fill, sand, repeat). Will keep going until I finish or run out of time and have to fly it up to Reno.
 
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