What are you doing in addition to flying?

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henryk

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Joined
Mar 8, 2010
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krakow,poland
=soft acceleration/ sharp deceleration (BUMPERS)

-last time=PULS bumpers=tremedous overlouds (< 1000 "G" )
 

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Yellowhammer

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Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
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821
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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
So....I'm kinda weird on sewing machines. I have a Thompson walking foot that I SHOULD be using, but I found a relatively rare (in the US at least) British Singer 201. It is considered to be the finest domestic sewing machine ever made, and is rumored to have been used in upholstering Rolls Royces. US Singer 201's all have a potted motor in the back. British ones used a handcrank, a rear motor like singer 99's, or a treadle. I found a 1938 model that was designed to either be treadled OR electric powered, and it still had the British motor and wiring on it. A warbride had brought it over, and it sat until I found it.
smoooooth.
I found a Brother commercial treadle base with a man sized foot pedal and much larger wheels. I mounted a different 201 on it, and swapped out the 201 hand wheel for a treadle wheel. I like it because it is slow or fast, and powerful. If you don't sew alot, the ability to punch one or two holes a second is cool. The 201 will do a few layers of upholstery leather, and I just sewed up a Bikini top for a buddies jeep, but I wouldn't try anything heavier than garment leather or appropriate upholstery leather. The first airplane I upholstered, I used the leather from a broken couch. Practice on free ones....



DP,

Thanks for the insight my friend. I saved the leather out of the back seat of my Chevrolet Tahoe for just such practice. Where do you suggest I begin looking for the proper sewing machine? Any websites or forums out there?

Thanks a ton for your help, wisdom, and guidance sir!

-Yellowhammer
 

Dillpickle

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Joined
May 3, 2014
Messages
319
Location
Piny Woods, Tx
Y
DP,

Thanks for the insight my friend. I saved the leather out of the back seat of my Chevrolet Tahoe for just such practice. Where do you suggest I begin looking for the proper sewing machine? Any websites or forums out there?

Thanks a ton for your help, wisdom, and guidance sir!

-Yellowhammer
You tube has lots of videos on the machines. This is a good one as an intro

Craigslist and FB marketplace, and old thrift stores. $200 is all I'd pay for a 15-95 or a 201. They are out there.
 

Dillpickle

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Joined
May 3, 2014
Messages
319
Location
Piny Woods, Tx
Mine is a 1946 Singer 15-90... I researched it thoroughly, before I bought it. Mine even has the original manual and the original boxful of bobbins, feet, etc.



@Pops

Dang fine machine, and good job finding one in belt drive vs potted drive. You can up the motor power easier. Here is a site I bounced questions off of when I set my 15 up.
Singer 15-91 these guys have broken all their machines, and fixes em so we don't have to break ours.
 

J.L. Frusha

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Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
1,045
Location
Luling, Texas
Dang fine machine, and good job finding one in belt drive vs potted drive. You can up the motor power easier. Here is a site I bounced questions off of when I set my 15 up.
Singer 15-91 these guys have broken all their machines, and fixes em so we don't have to break ours.
Oddly enough, back before I bought the Singer, I joined that site. When I opened the page, it showed my password (well, the dots for it) and I plugged in my email addy... Viola'! Logged in.

Word of advice: DON'T have Strokes that screw your memory up... For that matter, avoid having Strokes if at all possible.
 

Orange4sky

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Joined
Apr 14, 2020
Messages
72
I bought a cow hide to make the seat cushion for the JMR Special. Be thinking of buying an old machine off ebay and see what kind of job I can do since both of them says I can's use their machines.
What to buy ? any ideas ?

I got the bright idea to do that myself for my Stinson 108, so I have done a bunch of research and found a couple of good machines. I have made some covers for my car as practice.

If you plan on doing seat upholstery, I would look for a “walking foot” AKA “triple feed” AKA “compound feed” machine. The seams can get very thick, very fast in upholstery. Many seams will be four and six layers thick and a drop feed home machine will not manage more than a couple of layers. Singer 111w153 and 111w155 walking foot machines can be had quite reasonably. They were used extensively in WWII for all kinds of heavy duty work and are as sturdy as a P47 but as versatile as an L-5.

Parts are still widely available so an inop machine can be revived if you have some mechanical aptitude. Try to find mostly complete machines. There are tons of clones of these machines as well. Consew, Juki, Pfaff, and others all made near clones. There are plenty of excellent and clear videos on repair and timing of these machines. They run fast on their original clutch motors but that can be remedied as well. Lots of videos of solutions on that as well.

What a walking foot looks like.
79E839E5-127A-47C6-8666-ACDD99E31852.jpeg
111w153
95ECC7DE-13C8-4932-9D5A-7473A58969DF.jpeg
Practice cover
8DBD31F1-0547-4C4C-9D86-451CABFB5155.jpeg
 

Pops

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Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,267
Location
USA.
I got the bright idea to do that myself for my Stinson 108, so I have done a bunch of research and found a couple of good machines. I have made some covers for my car as practice.

If you plan on doing seat upholstery, I would look for a “walking foot” AKA “triple feed” AKA “compound feed” machine. The seams can get very thick, very fast in upholstery. Many seams will be four and six layers thick and a drop feed home machine will not manage more than a couple of layers. Singer 111w153 and 111w155 walking foot machines can be had quite reasonably. They were used extensively in WWII for all kinds of heavy duty work and are as sturdy as a P47 but as versatile as an L-5.

Parts are still widely available so an inop machine can be revived if you have some mechanical aptitude. Try to find mostly complete machines. There are tons of clones of these machines as well. Consew, Juki, Pfaff, and others all made near clones. There are plenty of excellent and clear videos on repair and timing of these machines. They run fast on their original clutch motors but that can be remedied as well. Lots of videos of solutions on that as well.

What a walking foot looks like.
View attachment 128072
111w153
View attachment 128071
Practice cover
View attachment 128073
Love that seat. So thats the car seat you done. I want to see pictures of the airplane seats.
 

Dillpickle

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 3, 2014
Messages
319
Location
Piny Woods, Tx
I got the bright idea to do that myself for my Stinson 108, so I have done a bunch of research and found a couple of good machines. I have made some covers for my car as practice.

If you plan on doing seat upholstery, I would look for a “walking foot” AKA “triple feed” AKA “compound feed” machine. The seams can get very thick, very fast in upholstery. Many seams will be four and six layers thick and a drop feed home machine will not manage more than a couple of layers. Singer 111w153 and 111w155 walking foot machines can be had quite reasonably. They were used extensively in WWII for all kinds of heavy duty work and are as sturdy as a P47 but as versatile as an L-5.

Parts are still widely available so an inop machine can be revived if you have some mechanical aptitude. Try to find mostly complete machines. There are tons of clones of these machines as well. Consew, Juki, Pfaff, and others all made near clones. There are plenty of excellent and clear videos on repair and timing of these machines. They run fast on their original clutch motors but that can be remedied as well. Lots of videos of solutions on that as well.

What a walking foot looks like.
View attachment 128072
111w153
View attachment 128071
Practice cover
View attachment 128073
Stepping up to a classic commercial machine is cool. I just saw a Thompson walking foot with a small table and a commercial motor for $500. The problem with the big machines is speed and table size. Gotta put those leviathans somewhere, lol. And figure two people to move it if it ain't on wheels.The clutch machines had a learning curve much like using a rivet gun. Beginners were all or nothing. The new motors are a little more controllable. I just gave one of those to my neighbor. And a 1938 Pfaff treadle to my son.
I got my singer walking foot from an estate sale. Had been sitting in a dry barn for decades. Just didn't have the room for it since downsizing shop and house. They are tough, but by the time you buy one ($500 to $1200 in my neck of the woods) you're getting dangerously close to the cost of paying someone to do it. I just like working on them, so I tend towards the rescue machines.
 

Orange4sky

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Joined
Apr 14, 2020
Messages
72
They are tough, but by the time you buy one ($500 to $1200 in my neck of the woods)
I paid $250 for the 111 which needed a bit of cleaning and a few parts and I have an industrial Juki needle feed I picked up for $225 but I spend a lot of time trolling Craigslist etc, waiting for deals and I have horseshoes where the sun don’t shine.
I just like working on them, so I tend towards the rescue machines.
This is the way. I’m going to be using mine for my furniture business so I have room and an economic justification to spend more. However, resale can be 100% or more if you don’t over pay and there’s good demand for the right used industrial machines.

Another way to look at it is that an industrial machine may cost about the same as a custom job but at the end you have two assets. The seats and the machine.

Maybe we should split this thread off since there seems to be quite a bit of interest.
 
Last edited:

Marc W

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Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Messages
914
Location
Colorado
A Pfaff machine was donated to our chapter. It seems to be complete but it will not pick up the bottom thread. Google has failed me. Can anybody tell me where to find a manual or any information about this machine?
 
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