What approach speed to use floating

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Pops

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People have ask how do you land. I tell them I don't know I just land. Really it easy, just do what it takes.
I realized a long time ago that I'm not a teacher.
I remember when I first started to take lessons, my instructor had been an instructor since 1937, would tell me to flair over the runway and see how long you can hold the wheels off the ground. Kept saying "Don't land, don't land ". So I guess the secret to landing is try not to land. :)
 

TarDevil

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“The runway behind you, the fuel at the FBO, and the altitude above you ...”
I followed one of our tenants taking his Mooney to a nearby FBO for radio work. When I landed back at our FBO he said, "Man, you really like to paint the numbers."

I quoted him the above.
 

jedi

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Dragging it in would be easier and a more common STOL technique.

Now I see your problem. Back when that book was written single engine approaches were made with the throttle at idle.

The you tube videos are not the methods proposed in the POH or taught in flight schools.

If you want to land short you need to land with the thrust maker at idle (with exceptions for Navy pilots).

If you want to be really good at crashing airplanes you have to get you flying lessons on You Tube.
 

PTAirco

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If you want to land short you need to land with the thrust maker at idle (with exceptions for Navy pilots).
If I want to land my Maule in the shortest possible distance, it can't be done without power. Unless you wish to crunch the landing gear. You need minimum forward speed which happens at around 55mph in my airplane. At that speed the sink rate is huge and you need power to keep it from sinking like a brick. And the only way to arrest it before touchdown is with more power. Without it you'll simply keep going right into the ground no matter how hard you try to flare.

I am not an advocate of that method for each and every landing. Under normal conditions with plenty of runway, I try to fly the thing with the power at idle from the base turn, but that will not give me the shortest landing distance.
 

PiperCruisin

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A couple days ago did an approach at 65 mph and cut power a little too high. Not exactly a carrier landing, but not the squeak, squeak I like either... it was definitely shorter. No wind, over the powerline, made the first turn without particularly hard braking. Probably not advisable to play with that sort of thing doing a night landing.
 

Victor Bravo

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IMHO power is absolutely fine to use on a short field (or minimum speed) landing. At lower final approach speeds, the descent rate gets way too high, and goosing the power on flare is a perfectly acceptable way to arrest the descent for the last couple of seconds.
 

keithkrum

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In my experience, for a truly short field, precision and airspeed control are more important than it being "pretty". Minor adjustments n power are almost always needed to get the touchdown where you want it to be.
 

jedi

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Remember that this thread is, I believe, from a PPL student practing normal landings and perhaps short field landings over the FAA standard 50 foot obstacle.

It is not a STOL contest landing.
 
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