Welding rotisserie

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,672
Location
Wisconsin
If anyone reads this and is considering building a rotisserie stand to weld a fuselage stop and try this first.

Like sheep most people build a fuselage welding jig low, so you can sit. Including me. Out of frustration tonight I jacked it up about 6' in the air so my welding is done at eye level while standing. It was awesome. I'm already half way done or I'd change my jig but if I were to do it over again I'd hang that prick from the ceiling somehow and have fun welding it. It makes a big difference.

Anyhow, it's easy in life to just do what every one always does but don't, step.out of the box and find a way that works for you. One of the hallmarks of a good weld is to weld in a comfortable position.

Mike
 

Chris In Marshfield

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
1,262
Location
Germantown, WI USA
Any problems with stability that you had to account for with the height adjustment? I figure, with a large airframe like a Bearhawk as an example, one might need to make the base a bit bigger to keep it from tipping. Your shop must have a fair amount of ceiling height. But, then again, a Cassut is pretty compact critter. When I build my shop (hopefully next year) there will be a high, vaulted ceiling to allow for a bigger critter like mine. Or if I get around to restoring that Howard :gig:
 

Mark Schoening

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Messages
116
Location
KRHI
Consider a rotisserie stand that is height adjustable - pipe with-in a pipe with a couple of set screws so the stand is infinitely and easily adjustable for height. Used mine for fuselage welding, tab attachments, cleaning and priming/painting, and then wing painting with "extra attachments". Sold it, but at times wished I hadn't.
 

dcstrng

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2010
Messages
913
Location
VA or NoDak
When I was diddling around on my Soneria, I used the rolling bases of two swivel chairs – used some PVC pipe over the stanchion and them used pins (through holes) for both height and rotation lock – for a small fuselage it rolled around pretty easily – don’t think I’d use it o heavier but with the bare Sonerai fuselage you almost had to tie it down to keep it from floating up. Just used little bolt on spigots as rotisserie axles...
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,672
Location
Wisconsin
Guys, I'm having a hard time which is the reason for the post. I'm just saying, think it through. Like chris said, it's a small critter. I was so frustrated this morning I almost tossed my fuselage and started over. Serious.

My eyes are phucked. Readers require a certain distance to work, that distance is difficult in a small fuselage because I can't get my head inside it. Arrrggg!!! Having a bad moment here. I get through it.

Suspend it from the ceiling using $10 in 2 x 4's and do this standing up is much muck better. But maybe it's just me. Just be sure and think for yourself I stead of following what everyone else does. That's my only point.

The very first lesson in both my welding schools was to absolutely be comfortable before beginning. I know better dammit, and my weld beads are suffering because of it.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
12,785
Location
Memphis, TN
For some welds, the thing is short enough to stand it on its tail for a different angle, but it would suck to do the same flipping it around and standing on a 7 ft ladder for an angle.
 
Top