Welding..keep the skills

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Derswede

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
935
Location
Central North Carolina
Had to do a bit of welding on the nose gear of the CGS Hawk. Pulled out the Oxy-acetylene torch and got it flaming. I had not used it in at least 5 years. Oxy regulator was leaking, probably a bad diaphragm, so I dug around until I found my father's old regulator, unused for at least 40 years. Put pressure onto the regulator, no leaks, confirmed that everything was working ok and was safe, fired the torch up and.....had to rethink the entire process. I had forgotten quite a bit about gas welding. It came back quickly, but I realized how out of practice I am. Got the piece welded, but it took awhile to let the memories come back. Just mentioning this as it got me thinking about keeping skills we all once had, but do we think about keeping the skills current? I will take my gas rig to my office, it will get used quite a bit more there. The wire welder is neat, but I had let the gas welding skills deteriorate. A friend who has welded for many years will give me a bit of a refresher course. Should keep me from hurting myself with it. Keep your skills up!

Derswede
 

PTAirco

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2003
Messages
3,528
Location
Corona CA
Back in England, we used to have to get a welding certification even for working on homebuilts. Andt the CAA required this to be done every 6 months. which may be fine if you're working for Boeing or De Havilland, but for the average homebuilder that it was excessively expensive. So I did my supervised test, sent the pieces to a lab, had them hammered, torn, bent and x-rayed to their heart's content. And all subsequent welding I've done since was done in the first 6 months after the test!

I don't think it's a skill you lose but lack of practice will make the welds look a little ugly to begin with until you get back into the swing of things.
 
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