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cluttonfred

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No, the Japanese WWII aircraft were original designs, it was just wartime propaganda that suggested they were copies of foreign aircraft. Check out the late Rene Francillon’s Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War, one of my favorites of the Putnam series, for a great overview of Japanese aviation at that point in time.
 

Toobuilder

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A bunch of 109 parts in that thing, and if you look closely and read the wiki article it looks like they used the gear too. Simply swapped it side for side. Note the characteristic angle between the strut and axle.
 

Riggerrob

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That Finnish prototype is detailed in Justo Miranda's book "Enemy at the Gate, panic fighters of World War 2."
Australia - Boomerang
Belgium - Renard
Canada - Gregor FDB-1
Estonia -
France - Caudron
Great Britain - Miles M.20
Holland - Koolhoven
Italy - Ambrosini
Japan - Oka
Latvia -
Poland - PZL P 50 Jaztrab
Romania - IAR
Sweden - FFVS J 22
United States - Bell XP-49
Yugoslavia - Rugozarski IK-3
all proposed or built light-weight fighters in the rush to re-arm before World War 2 plunged the planet into chaos.
 

Riggerrob

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It’s embarrassing how backwards-thinking our Canuck entry was on this list. Cool plane though and I’ve always thought it could have found its niche defending convoys.
Gregor was stubborn advocate of biplanes. Sure biplanes could still out-turn monoplanes and they could fly for short airstrips, but their slow speeds rendered them obsolete by 1939.

Early in World War 2, the RCAF was so desperate for coastal patrol planes that the flew CCF-built Grumman Goblin biplanes to patrol approaches to Halifax harbor. Those Goblins had two seats and retractable landing gear.
 

cluttonfred

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Per René Francillon, the original Ki-61 was powered by the 1,100 hp Ha-40, a licensed copy of the Daimler-Benz DB601A. Kawasaki then developed their own more powerful evolution of the engine, the 1,500 hp Ha-140 optimized for high altitude for the improved Ki-61-II intended to intercept American heavy bombers. The engine had problems, however, and as a result a lot of Ki-61-II airframes sat unused waiting for the engine issues to get sorted out. In the end, Kawasaki turned to the big 14-cylinder Mitsubushi Ha-112-II radial original intended for bombers. The result was a plane that was lighter and handier than the inline version and only slightly slower, but the engine was reliable and well-proven. The Ki-100 could take on B-29s at altitude and tangle with Hellcats on equal terms but they were too few too late for the Japanese war effort.
 
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