Very new to Airplanes Not new to Subaru Engines

Discussion in 'Subaru' started by ScottSti, May 15, 2012.

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  1. May 15, 2012 #1

    ScottSti

    ScottSti

    ScottSti

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    Ok first off, I am glad i found this site. Second my name is Scott and I am the owner of a Subaru Performance Shop in Central Florida. I had a customer come in and he brought me a Subaru Engine with a Airplane Prop attached to it. Well since he knows that Im good with Subaru Engine and it needs to be rebuilt, well now its my project for a bit. Well I have a issue. How do i remove the assembly from the fly wheel so i can get to the Engine. I can see what looks like spanner wrench tool marks but it looks like the hub the the prop bolts to is pressed on and has to be pressed of. But i am not sure so I am looking for some info on how they attach props the car engines so i can remove the assembly for engine rebuild. Please help. Ohh and the engine is a EA82T
     
  2. May 15, 2012 #2

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

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    Hi Scott, prop hubs are usually fitted to the output shaft with a taper and drawbolt, very similar to how a steering wheel is fitted to the steering shaft. To remove it you would usually use a puller which you could fabricate from some thick steel plate, say 1/2" and three bolts with nuts through the prop mounting holes and a fourth bolt through a tapped thread in the centre of the plate which you would use to jack the hub away from the shaft. A word of caution though, if the hub is aluminum, which it is most likely to be, don't do as you would with a steel part i.e. get it under pressure with the jack bolt and then give it a whack with a hammer because you would damage the hub. Much better to get it under tension and then apply heat evenly all around the hub and it will pop off.

    If that isn't the obvious way it is fitted then post a photo here and there is bound to be plenty of people who will recognise which type it is. Cheers, Alan
     
  3. May 15, 2012 #3

    ScottSti

    ScottSti

    ScottSti

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    Thank you thank you thank you. That is what it looks like but i wanted to kinda have a right idea. I will proceed in the morning and let you know how it goes
     
  4. Dec 7, 2012 #4

    Glastar1

    Glastar1

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    To Any and All who may know: What area the coolant flow routes in the 2.5L Subaru engines? I was told by the owner of a Subaru rebuild shop that the coolant is pulled by the pump at the FRONT of the RH head where the coolant is hottest and where it bears directly onto the sensing side of the thermostat. This made sense to me until I removed the coolant pump. The blades and the direction of rotation said the hot coolant from the cabin heater via a 1/2" I.D. hose bearing onto the sensing side of the theremostat kept it open so that coolant from the heat-exchanger (radiator) could enter the head. I just couldn't believe it! It seemed to me that cold coolant from the Heat Exchanger (HE) would close the thermostat immediately! Does anyone know the truth about this? Clearly, the cooling system works as the engines come from the Subaru factory. Please excuse my earlier submission. I wrote it early in the morning before I had turned my brain on.
    Respectfuly,
    Glastar1
     
  5. Dec 7, 2012 #5

    rv6ejguy

    rv6ejguy

    rv6ejguy

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    The coolant flow on EJ and EG engines is pulled in the from the rad through the thermostat housing by the water pump. The heater core flow (or bypass hose if no HC is fitted) is required to make the thermostat open. Heater cores are always flowing coolant in Subarus, only the air inlet to the core is varied for heat. If you plug off the bypass ports on the T stat housing and have no HC flow, the T stat will not open as a few people have found out the hard way! Don't fit a coolant valve in the heater system either as this has caused exactly what you surmised when opening it at cold temps- the T stat closes immediately. Bad news!

    Coolant flow on these Sube engines is very well thought unlike many other engine designs out there but the opposed layout makes them easier to trap air in the system which can cause overheating in non-standard applications like aircraft. An active bleed with .125 ID hose from the coolant crossover manifold on top of the block to the highest point is the system (usually the fill reservoir or expansion tank) nicely solves this problem.
     
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