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Ultralight markings

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Pilot-34

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Apr 7, 2020
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Are you guys forgetting “G” , “D”, “F”, and “C” numbers ?
 

TFF

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Apr 28, 2010
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Location
Memphis, TN
If you want it, put it in 1” letters around the windscreen. Don’t put it where it can be confused. Most would never notice or care, but if you do find the right FAA inspector, the only thing that will satisfy them is taking a pocket knife and cutting it off.
You might want to proudly display your ham, but conflicting script between two federal agencies is just asking for it. Heck you might not get grief from the FAA but the FCC pulls it. You never know with the government. I bet both agencies are ready to save the world after being stuck at home.
 

radfordc

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Feb 5, 2008
Messages
1,414
In the US ultralights aren't aircraft; they don't have to comply with any regulations other than CFR Part 103. Part 103 says nothing about markings....if there is a regulation in the rest of the CFRs about markings (there is) it doesn't apply to ultralights. No matter how bad a day the FAA inspector is having he still has to cite a regulation for enforcement. If your fear of "the man" is such that you are unwilling to follow the regs as written then that's another problem.
 

TFF

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It’s not fearing the man, it’s a long drawn dealing with something that did not need to happen. If it’s a fight you want to make, then I hope you succeed. They get payed if they are wrong or not. I was a part of a year and a half NTSB investigation because of one sentence in a report. If it was off runway it would have been no report. Overboard is what they are about.
 

Dana

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CT, USA
Do you really want your ultralight to be that easily identified?

Say you're cruising across open country, legally, at 50 foot altitude. 99% of the people on the ground who see you will think it's cool (as long as you don't overdo it). Then you fly over a tree and there's a lady sunbathing nude. She's convinced you're a creepazoid peeping tom, notes the number and googles it (as I just did), and knows exactly who you are and where you live. She calls the cops, exaggerates about how you were flying in an unsafe manner and endangering her. Cops may or may not believe here and investigate.

Without the number, it's a lot harder.

I got in trouble years ago for low flying. I was legal, flying 50-100' high over open water more than 500' out from shore. Probably not smart like a lot of other foolish things I did in my 20s, but perfectly legal. A lifeguard on the beach got my number and complained, swore I was 10' high directly over people on the beach. Who do you think the FAA believed?

Why make it easy for them? Absent a number to report and miles from home, I wouldn't even have heard about it. I later learned through the grapevine that this particular lifeguard hated airplanes for some reason and complained about them every chance he got.
 

Aerowerx

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Dec 1, 2011
Messages
5,610
Location
Marion, Ohio
In the US ultralights aren't aircraft; they don't have to comply with any regulations other than CFR Part 103. Part 103 says nothing about markings....if there is a regulation in the rest of the CFRs about markings (there is) it doesn't apply to ultralights. No matter how bad a day the FAA inspector is having he still has to cite a regulation for enforcement. If your fear of "the man" is such that you are unwilling to follow the regs as written then that's another problem.
HOWEVER, as stated earlier in this thread....

An "ultralight" can be registered EAB, in which case it would required proper markings.

Say you have the letter N, followed by some combination of letters and numbers on your "ultralight". An FAA inspector, who is behind on his monthly quota, walks up and asks why he can't find you in his pocket database of EAB registration numbers?

Considering some of the ramp check stories I have seen here on HBA, they sometimes make up their own regulations. It would be far easier to NOT have something that looks like a registration number, then trying to get yourself out of trouble, real or imaginary.
 
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