Two-seat WWII warbird replica candidates?

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cluttonfred

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OK, here’s something I’ve been musing on for a while….

What would be a good candidate for a single-engine scale replica WWII warbird with two real seats?

Let’s set aside conversions of single-seat fighters to two-seaters, the usual two-seat basic or advanced trainers, and the well-known liaison aircraft.

What would be a good candidate for a full-size or reduced-scale replica *combat* aircraft of WWII?

Here are a few off the top of my head….

Commonwealth Wirraway
1647642846960.jpeg

Tachikawa Ki-36
1647643039563.jpeg

Vickers Wellesley
1647642730612.jpeg

Vought Kingfisher
1647643193674.jpeg

Of course, the retractable gear ones are problematic. Any more ideas? Bonus points if you include a period photo in your post.
 
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Tiger Tim

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I have this wild idea for a scale Vindicator: cosmetically modify a Nanchang CJ-6. It’s not all that crazy, just take a look at the general arrangements of both:
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1647646236625.jpeg
In both of them you have a radial engine, a pilot seated at the leading edge of the wing, a second seat around the trailing edge, about the same wing planform AND flat centre section, a vertical tail perched entirely on top of the fuselage and a horizontal tail projecting just a little out behind it. Seems to me a new cowling, new heavily framed canopy, wing tips, tail tips, and paint ought to get you most of the way there. The landing gear is a little more problematic, maybe just don’t let anyone see it with the gear down…
1647646516369.jpeg
 

Mad MAC

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The Fairy Battle is much the same configuration as the Vindicator but requires an inline engine. Its use as an engine test bed could allow all sorts of cowl shapes that are historically accurate.
iu


The Grumman Avenger, is probably a good place to start given it was the largest single engine aircraft of the war. Given its size & fuselage proportions, one could just about make it a 3 seater scale replica (there is a story of the RNZAF using one to fly a whole rugby team [15 players] to another base for a match). If one built a post war config airframe you won't need to build a gun turret.OhG4424-54.jpg
Crown Copyright 1954, New Zealand Defence Force
 
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Hawk81A

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If we're talking 2 seats (or more), and since someone has already mentioned the Avenger, go BIG, or go home. DennisTBD-1-YT6-KwajaleinFeb42.jpg
 

Wanttaja

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There was a nicely done scaled Stuka at Oshkosh many years ago. The last that I heard, it no longer was flying and was being moved to a museum.
Might be thinking of the Kurzenburger Stuka. It crashed fatally in 2000 (IAD00FA044). Someone may have restored it.

Interesting writeup:

The pilot departed on his first flight in the recently purchased home-built airplane, and crashed
into trees and terrain shortly after takeoff. According to his wife, he had never been in the
airplane while it was running, and he was only supposed to taxi the airplane and then return it
to its hangar. The pilot's wife, son, and witnesses described the wings 'rocking' and the nose
pitching up and down throughout the brief flight. According to one witness, 'It just seemed like
he couldn't control it. Doggone, he didn't have much control of that thing on Friday. The
engine sure seemed alright, he just didn't seem to have control of that **** airplane.' The
pilot who delivered the airplane to the pilot and his son said the airplane experienced a
pronounced break to the left when stalled. The pilot's exact flight experience could not be
determined due to sporadic entries in multiple logbooks. The pilot's most recently
documented biennial flight review was 2 years and 6 months prior to the accident.

Examination of the wreckage revealed no mechanical anomalies and several pieces of angular
cut wood, approximately 4 inches in diameter, were found around and beneath the wreckage.
According to FAA advisor circular 20-27D: '...FAA inspections of amateur-built aircraft have
been limited to ensuring the use of acceptable workmanship methods, techniques, practices,
and issuing operating limitations necessary to protect persons and property not involved in
this activity.'

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to obtain/maintain aircraft control after takeoff.


Not sure what was the deal was with the "several piece of angular cut wood approximately 4 inches in diameter...."

Found this picture of it in the November 1990 edition of SPORT AVIATION.
kurzenburger stuka.JPG
Ron Wanttaja
 

Riggerrob

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Two seater, single engine, fixed gear for simplicity, and a truly iconic shape:

Junkers_Ju_87Ds_in_flight_Oct_1943.jpg
Pete Bowers proposed a Stuka replica based upon his Namu two-seater (side-by-side) with an inverted gull wing. I never heard of any being built. Namu had a complex, wooden, inverted gull wing and fixed landing gear.
Namu was the less successful bigger brother to Bowers wildly popular Fly Baby. Fly Baby's biggest advantage was its simple construction, well suited to home workshops with limited tooling.

Another American did build a reduced scale Stuka replica, but it was strictly a one-off. I vaguely remember that replica having two seats.
 

Aesquire

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Douglas SBD. While no racer, the original was maneuverable enough to fight Zeros in CAP use. Fairly simple lines except for the wing fillets.
 
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Riggerrob

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The Fairy Battle is much the same configuration as the Vindicator but requires an inline engine. Its use as an engine test bed could allow all sorts of cowl shapes that are historically accurate.
iu


The Grumman Avenger, is probably a good place to start given it was the largest single engine aircraft of the war. Given its size & fuselage proportions, one could just about make it a 3 seater scale replica (there is a story of the RNZAF using one to fly a whole rugby team [15 players] to another base for a match). If one built a post war config airframe you won't need to build a gun turret.View attachment 123584
Crown Copyright 1954, New Zealand Defence Force
That Fairey Battle reminds us of a whole slew of monoplane, two-seater fighters flown by the (British) Royal Navy: Fulmar, Firefly (Merlin), Firefly (Griffon), Roc, etc.

On second thought, you can forget about the Roc as its turret was as cramped as the Boulton-Paul Defiant. Defiant turret was so cramped that G.Q. had to invent a radically different type of parachute for the gunner: Para-Jerkin. Para-Jerkin was basically a soft vest that spread the parachute bulk over the widest possible are of the gunners' backside. Some wags called it the "Dumbo Suit" as it made the gunner look like he suffered from a saggy, elephant butt. Hah! Hah!
 

Wanttaja

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Pete Bowers proposed a Stuka replica based upon his Namu two-seater (side-by-side) with an inverted gull wing. I never heard of any being built. Namu had a complex, wooden, inverted gull wing and fixed landing gear.
Namu was the less successful bigger brother to Bowers wildly popular Fly Baby. Fly Baby's biggest advantage was its simple construction, well suited to home workshops with limited tooling.
Always thought a Namu with a faux German paint scheme would be pretty cool. Drive the planespotters nuts....
namu_threepoint.JPG
Ron Wanttaja
 

Wolfen1176

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F-82 has been on my mind. Maybe a pair of RV4 or 8 fuselage's and build up a wing center section. Could be a nice 4 seater airbatic twin.
 

BJC

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Might be thinking of the Kurzenburger Stuka.
That is it. Thanks, Ron.
It crashed fatally in 2000 (IAD00FA044). Someone may have restored it.
My memory is that my friend was asked to bid on moving it. He moved lots of military aircraft, mostly to museums, but some (such as a local P-40) to restoration shops.


BJC
 

cluttonfred

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Here are two more if you want to get your feet wet.

Shavrov Sh-2
The Sh-2 is a big, heavy plane for its 100 hp engine with a 13 m (42 ft 8 in) upper wingspan 1,160 kg (2,557 lb) gross weight. At 7/8 scale with an 83 hp Verner Scarlett 5S it would still be a big plane with 11.375 m (over 37 ft) span but with 77% of the wing area and 56% of the weight at the LSA seaplane max 650 kg (1,430 lb). That would be a much improved wing and power loading over the original but still pretty close in size.

FDA3E59A-E5A2-4E81-A4C0-AE9BDC517DBF.png

Supermarine Walrus
The Walrus is quite literally massive with a 45 ft 10 in (13.97 m) span, 7,200 lb (3,266 kg) normal gross weight, and a 750 hp Bristol Pegasus VI 9-cylinder radial. At 2/3 scale the span would be just 30 ft 6 in (9.3 m) with 44% of the wing area for just 20% of the gross weight at LSA seaplane max of 1,430 lb (650 kg). A 158 hp Scarlett 9S would actually match the power loading of the original but at such reduced wing loading a 124 hp Scarlett 7U would be plenty.

B504AA6F-0EB9-45C5-905F-5E7E7CD08280.jpeg
 
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