Treated wood could be as strong as CF?

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

rtfm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2008
Messages
3,434
Location
Brisbane, Australia
Sounds exciting. The downside of this is that its going to cost more than either CF or steel. It's the way of the world I guess...
 

Tiger Tim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
3,652
Location
Thunder Bay
That’s neat. While obviously not quite the same, the root ends of MT propeller blades go through a process of being compressed to what they call a plasticized state and I believe also impregnated with some sort of resin down to a cellular level.
 

Yellowhammer

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
511
Location
Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
This principle of compressing the wood is the same principle as forging steel.

Southern Yellow Pine, for example, is stronger than steel, has a better fire rating than steel, and just looks better than steel.

To go even further, engineered wood such as glue laminated beams made from dimensional lumber is extremely strong. Each piece of lumber is chosen for the glue lamination lay up by the structure of its grain and the tightness of its growth rings and the rings camber. Each section of lumber is then finger jointed and glued as it is in between each layup.

The next step is to send the entire layup or beam through a high pressure and heat curing / joining machine. The end product is a ridiculously strong.

I have often thought about taking aircraft grade spruce and or douglas fir and applying the same principle for creating a super strong, lightweight spar.

Of course their are other products considered to be engineered wood such as plywood and OSB. I would never use OSB for any aerospace application but we commonly use plied, aircraft grade wood for wing skins which is very strong if applied correctly.

-Yellowhammer
 

Vigilant1

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
5,991
Location
US
The interesting questions are how dense, how machinable, how rot resistant, and how expensive?
And:
It is compressed today, and the remaining lignin is keeping it compressed. Today. In 10 years, through hundreds of thermal and moisture cycles?
Natural wood is a wonderful material, but it took a long time to find how to reliably create structures with it that are light, strong, and durable.
 

Jimstix

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2012
Messages
149
Location
LAS CRUCES NM
... and the prices for lumber are approaching those for CF in a hurry, yikes! The other issue is quality control without industrial-scale production.
 
Top